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Developing Syndromic Surveillance to Monitor and Respond to Adverse Health Events Related to Psychoactive Substance Use: Methods and Applications.

Abstract Recent increases in drug overdose deaths, both in New York City and nationally, highlight the need for timely data on psychoactive drug-related morbidity. We developed drug syndrome definitions for syndromic surveillance to monitor drug-related emergency department (ED) visits in real time.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

drugs

interventions

syndromic surveillance

Journal Title public health reports (washington, d.c. : 1974)
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28692400
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170710
DCOM- 20170724
LR  - 20170724
IS  - 1468-2877 (Electronic)
IS  - 0033-3549 (Linking)
VI  - 132
IP  - 1_suppl
DP  - 2017 Jul/Aug
TI  - Developing Syndromic Surveillance to Monitor and Respond to Adverse Health Events
      Related to Psychoactive Substance Use: Methods and Applications.
PG  - 65S-72S
LID - 10.1177/0033354917718074 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Recent increases in drug overdose deaths, both in New York City and
      nationally, highlight the need for timely data on psychoactive drug-related
      morbidity. We developed drug syndrome definitions for syndromic surveillance to
      monitor drug-related emergency department (ED) visits in real time. MATERIALS AND
      METHODS: We used 2012 archived syndromic surveillance data from New York City
      hospitals to develop definitions for psychoactive drug-related syndromes. The
      dataset contained ED visit-level information that included patients' chief
      complaints, dates of visits, ZIP codes of residence, discharge diagnoses, and
      dispositions. After manually reviewing chief complaints, we developed a
      classification scheme comprising 3 categories (overdose, drug mention, and drug
      abuse/misuse), which we used to define 25 psychoactive drug syndromes. From July 
      2013 through December 2015, the New York City Department of Health and Mental
      Hygiene performed daily syndromic surveillance of psychoactive drug-related ED
      visits using the 25 syndrome definitions. RESULTS: Syndromic surveillance
      triggered 4 public health investigations, supported 8 other public health
      investigations that had been triggered by other mechanisms, and resulted in the
      identification of 5 psychoactive drug-related outbreaks. Syndromic surveillance
      also identified a substantial increase in synthetic cannabinoid-related visits
      (from an average of 3 per week in January 2014 to >300 per week in July 2015) and
      an increase in heroin overdose visits (from 80 to 171 in the first 3 quarters of 
      2012 and 2014, respectively) in a single neighborhood. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:
      Syndromic surveillance using these novel definitions enabled monitoring of trends
      in psychoactive drug-related morbidity, initiation and support of public health
      investigations, and targeting of interventions. Health departments can refine
      these definitions for their jurisdictions using the described methods and
      integrate them into existing syndromic surveillance systems.
FAU - Nolan, Michelle L
AU  - Nolan ML
AD  - 1 Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention, Care, and Treatment, New York City
      Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY, USA.
FAU - Kunins, Hillary V
AU  - Kunins HV
AD  - 1 Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention, Care, and Treatment, New York City
      Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY, USA.
FAU - Lall, Ramona
AU  - Lall R
AD  - 2 Bureau of Communicable Diseases, New York City Department of Health and Mental 
      Hygiene, Queens, NY, USA.
FAU - Paone, Denise
AU  - Paone D
AD  - 1 Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Use Prevention, Care, and Treatment, New York City
      Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Public Health Rep
JT  - Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)
JID - 9716844
RN  - 0 (Psychotropic Drugs)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Drug Overdose/prevention & control
MH  - Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration/*statistics & numerical
      data
MH  - Humans
MH  - New York City/epidemiology
MH  - Population Surveillance/*methods
MH  - Psychotropic Drugs/*adverse effects
MH  - Public Health Informatics/methods
MH  - Substance-Related Disorders/*epidemiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - drugs
OT  - interventions
OT  - syndromic surveillance
EDAT- 2017/07/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/11 06:00
AID - 10.1177/0033354917718074 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Public Health Rep. 2017 Jul/Aug;132(1_suppl):65S-72S. doi:
      10.1177/0033354917718074.