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Protection during production: Problems due to prevention? Nail and skin condition after prolonged wearing of occlusive gloves.

Abstract Wearing of occlusive gloves during the whole working shift is considered a risk factor for developing hand eczema, similar to wet work. Moreover, the increased hydration due to glove occlusion may lead to brittle nails. Two hundred and seventy clean room workers, wearing occlusive gloves for prolonged periods, and 135 administrative employees not using gloves were investigated. This included a dermatological examination of the nails and the hands, using the Hand Eczema ScoRe for Occupational Screening (HEROS), measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and a standardized interview. Of the clean room workers, 39%, mainly women, reported nail problems, mostly brittle nails with onychoschisis. Skin score values showed no significant differences between HEROS values of both groups. TEWL values of exposed subjects were similar to TEWL values of controls 40 min after taking off the occlusive gloves. In a multiple linear regression analysis, male gender and duration of employment in the clean room were associated with a significant increase in TEWL values. The effect of occlusion on TEWL seems to be predominantly transient and not be indicative of a damaged skin barrier. This study confirmed the results of a previous investigation showing no serious adverse effect of wearing of occlusive gloves on skin condition without exposure to additional hazardous substances. However, occlusion leads to softened nails prone to mechanical injury. Therefore, specific prevention instructions are required to pay attention to this side effect of occlusion.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title journal of toxicology and environmental health. part a
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28696905
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170711
DCOM- 20170830
LR  - 20170830
IS  - 1528-7394 (Print)
IS  - 0098-4108 (Linking)
VI  - 80
IP  - 7-8
DP  - 2017
TI  - Protection during production: Problems due to prevention? Nail and skin condition
      after prolonged wearing of occlusive gloves.
PG  - 396-404
LID - 10.1080/10937404.2017.1304741 [doi]
AB  - Wearing of occlusive gloves during the whole working shift is considered a risk
      factor for developing hand eczema, similar to wet work. Moreover, the increased
      hydration due to glove occlusion may lead to brittle nails. Two hundred and
      seventy clean room workers, wearing occlusive gloves for prolonged periods, and
      135 administrative employees not using gloves were investigated. This included a 
      dermatological examination of the nails and the hands, using the Hand Eczema
      ScoRe for Occupational Screening (HEROS), measurement of transepidermal water
      loss (TEWL), and a standardized interview. Of the clean room workers, 39%, mainly
      women, reported nail problems, mostly brittle nails with onychoschisis. Skin
      score values showed no significant differences between HEROS values of both
      groups. TEWL values of exposed subjects were similar to TEWL values of controls
      40 min after taking off the occlusive gloves. In a multiple linear regression
      analysis, male gender and duration of employment in the clean room were
      associated with a significant increase in TEWL values. The effect of occlusion on
      TEWL seems to be predominantly transient and not be indicative of a damaged skin 
      barrier. This study confirmed the results of a previous investigation showing no 
      serious adverse effect of wearing of occlusive gloves on skin condition without
      exposure to additional hazardous substances. However, occlusion leads to softened
      nails prone to mechanical injury. Therefore, specific prevention instructions are
      required to pay attention to this side effect of occlusion.
FAU - Weistenhofer, Wobbeke
AU  - Weistenhofer W
AD  - a Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental
      Medicine , Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) , Erlangen ,
      Germany.
FAU - Uter, Wolfgang
AU  - Uter W
AD  - b Department of Medical Informatics , Biometry and Epidemiology,
      Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) , Erlangen , Germany.
FAU - Drexler, Hans
AU  - Drexler H
AD  - a Institute and Outpatient Clinic of Occupational, Social and Environmental
      Medicine , Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) , Erlangen ,
      Germany.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170711
PL  - England
TA  - J Toxicol Environ Health A
JT  - Journal of toxicology and environmental health. Part A
JID - 100960995
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Dermatitis, Occupational/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology
MH  - Eczema/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology
MH  - Female
MH  - Germany/epidemiology
MH  - Gloves, Protective/*adverse effects
MH  - Hand Dermatoses/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Nail Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/12 06:00
AID - 10.1080/10937404.2017.1304741 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017;80(7-8):396-404. doi:
      10.1080/10937404.2017.1304741. Epub 2017 Jul 11.