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Mortality from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease Among Different Occupation Groups - United States, 1985-2011.

Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease, both progressive neurodegenerative diseases, affect >1 million Americans (1,2). Consistently reported risk factors for ALS include increasing age, male sex, and cigarette smoking (1); risk factors for Parkinson's disease include increasing age, male sex, and pesticide exposure, whereas cigarette smoking and caffeine consumption are inversely associated (2). Relative to cancer or respiratory diseases, the role of occupation in neurologic diseases is much less studied and less well understood (3). CDC evaluated associations between usual occupation and ALS and Parkinson's disease mortality using data from CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Occupational Mortality Surveillance (NOMS), a population-based surveillance system that includes approximately 12.1 million deaths from 30 U.S. states.* Associations were estimated using proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs), standardizing indirectly by age, sex, race, and calendar year to the standard population of all NOMS deaths with occupation information. Occupations associated with higher socioeconomic status (SES) had elevated ALS and Parkinson's disease mortality. The shifts in the U.S. workforce toward older ages and higher SES occupations(†) highlight the importance of understanding this finding, which will require studies with designs that provide evidence for causality, detailed exposure assessment, and adjustment for additional potential confounders.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Status Disparities

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28704346
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170713
DCOM- 20170714
LR  - 20170714
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 27
DP  - 2017 Jul 14
TI  - Mortality from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease Among
      Different Occupation Groups - United States, 1985-2011.
PG  - 718-722
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6627a2 [doi]
AB  - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease, both progressive
      neurodegenerative diseases, affect >1 million Americans (1,2). Consistently
      reported risk factors for ALS include increasing age, male sex, and cigarette
      smoking (1); risk factors for Parkinson's disease include increasing age, male
      sex, and pesticide exposure, whereas cigarette smoking and caffeine consumption
      are inversely associated (2). Relative to cancer or respiratory diseases, the
      role of occupation in neurologic diseases is much less studied and less well
      understood (3). CDC evaluated associations between usual occupation and ALS and
      Parkinson's disease mortality using data from CDC's National Institute for
      Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Occupational Mortality
      Surveillance (NOMS), a population-based surveillance system that includes
      approximately 12.1 million deaths from 30 U.S. states.* Associations were
      estimated using proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs), standardizing indirectly
      by age, sex, race, and calendar year to the standard population of all NOMS
      deaths with occupation information. Occupations associated with higher
      socioeconomic status (SES) had elevated ALS and Parkinson's disease mortality.
      The shifts in the U.S. workforce toward older ages and higher SES
      occupationsdagger highlight the importance of understanding this finding, which
      will require studies with designs that provide evidence for causality, detailed
      exposure assessment, and adjustment for additional potential confounders.
FAU - Beard, John D
AU  - Beard JD
FAU - Steege, Andrea L
AU  - Steege AL
FAU - Ju, Jun
AU  - Ju J
FAU - Lu, John
AU  - Lu J
FAU - Luckhaupt, Sara E
AU  - Luckhaupt SE
FAU - Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K
AU  - Schubauer-Berigan MK
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170714
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/*mortality
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Status Disparities
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Occupations/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Parkinson Disease/*mortality
MH  - Social Class
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/15 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6627a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jul 14;66(27):718-722. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6627a2.