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Surgical Management of Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

Abstract Surgery for patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction (nLUTD) is indicated when medical therapy fails, to correct conditions affecting patient safety, or when surgery can enhance the quality of life better than nonoperative management. Examples include failure of maximal medical therapy, inability to perform or aversion to clean intermittent catheterization, refractory incontinence, and complications from chronic, indwelling catheters. Adults with nLUTD have competing risk factors, including previous operations, obesity, poor nutritional status, complex living arrangements, impaired dexterity/paralysis, and impaired executive and cognitive function. Complications are common in this subgroup of patients requiring enduring commitments from surgeons, patients, and their caretakers.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

Congenital urology

Neurogenic bladder

Spina bifida

Transitional urology

Urinary diversion

Urinary reconstruction

Journal Title the urologic clinics of north america
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28716327
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170718
DCOM- 20170803
LR  - 20170803
IS  - 1558-318X (Electronic)
IS  - 0094-0143 (Linking)
VI  - 44
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Surgical Management of Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.
PG  - 475-490
LID - S0094-0143(17)30031-9 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ucl.2017.04.013 [doi]
AB  - Surgery for patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction (nLUTD) is
      indicated when medical therapy fails, to correct conditions affecting patient
      safety, or when surgery can enhance the quality of life better than nonoperative 
      management. Examples include failure of maximal medical therapy, inability to
      perform or aversion to clean intermittent catheterization, refractory
      incontinence, and complications from chronic, indwelling catheters. Adults with
      nLUTD have competing risk factors, including previous operations, obesity, poor
      nutritional status, complex living arrangements, impaired dexterity/paralysis,
      and impaired executive and cognitive function. Complications are common in this
      subgroup of patients requiring enduring commitments from surgeons, patients, and 
      their caretakers.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Gor, Ronak A
AU  - Gor RA
AD  - Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street Southeast,
      MMC 394, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
FAU - Elliott, Sean P
AU  - Elliott SP
AD  - Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street Southeast,
      MMC 394, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Urol Clin North Am
JT  - The Urologic clinics of North America
JID - 0423221
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Humans
MH  - Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/*surgery
MH  - Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic/*surgery
MH  - Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Congenital urology
OT  - Neurogenic bladder
OT  - Spina bifida
OT  - Transitional urology
OT  - Urinary diversion
OT  - Urinary reconstruction
EDAT- 2017/07/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/19 06:00
AID - S0094-0143(17)30031-9 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ucl.2017.04.013 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Urol Clin North Am. 2017 Aug;44(3):475-490. doi: 10.1016/j.ucl.2017.04.013.