PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Cognitive Outcomes and Psychiatric Symptoms of Retinopathy-Positive Cerebral Malaria: Cohort Description and Baseline Results.

Abstract Cerebral malaria (CM) is a common cause of death and disability among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Many prior studies of neuropsychiatric morbidity have been limited by a cross-sectional design or a short duration of follow-up. Most have included subjects who may have presented with coma due to a disease process other than CM. No studies have assessed the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and long-term outcomes. The Cognitive Outcomes and Psychiatric symptoms of retinopathy-positive CM (COPS) cohort is the first large (N = 221) prospectively recruited cohort of stringently defined cases of CM and hospital-based, age-matched, non-CM controls in whom cognitive and psychiatric outcomes are assessed with standardized measures semi-annually for up to 5 years. We report baseline characteristics of the cohort and outcomes at 1 month. At enrollment, CM cases were more likely to come from families with fewer socioeconomic resources and to have health characteristics that increase risk for malaria. In children younger than 5 years, cases were delayed in motor, language, and social development by approximately 6 months, compared with controls. More significant delays occurred in those with MRI abnormalities at the 1-month follow-up visit. There were no differences between cases and controls in inhibitory self-control, nor in cognitive function in children ≥ 5 years of age. The latter finding may be related to the smaller sample size, case-control imbalance in socioeconomic status, or the use of cognitive and behavioral assessments that are less culturally appropriate to this population. Continued follow-up will help determine predictors of long-term outcomes.
PMID
Related Publications

Neurologic outcomes in retinopathy-negative cerebral malaria survivors.

Identification of malaria retinopathy improves the specificity of the clinical diagnosis of cerebral malaria: findings from a prospective cohort study.

Developmental outcomes in Malawian children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria.

Blantyre Malaria Project Epilepsy Study (BMPES) of neurological outcomes in retinopathy-positive paediatric cerebral malaria survivors: a prospective cohort study.

Retinopathy in severe malaria in Ghanaian children--overlap between fundus changes in cerebral and non-cerebral malaria.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the american journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28719298
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170718
DCOM- 20170731
LR  - 20170731
IS  - 1476-1645 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-9637 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - Cognitive Outcomes and Psychiatric Symptoms of Retinopathy-Positive Cerebral
      Malaria: Cohort Description and Baseline Results.
PG  - 225-231
LID - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0020 [doi]
AB  - Cerebral malaria (CM) is a common cause of death and disability among children in
      sub-Saharan Africa. Many prior studies of neuropsychiatric morbidity have been
      limited by a cross-sectional design or a short duration of follow-up. Most have
      included subjects who may have presented with coma due to a disease process other
      than CM. No studies have assessed the relationship between magnetic resonance
      imaging (MRI) findings and long-term outcomes. The Cognitive Outcomes and
      Psychiatric symptoms of retinopathy-positive CM (COPS) cohort is the first large 
      (N = 221) prospectively recruited cohort of stringently defined cases of CM and
      hospital-based, age-matched, non-CM controls in whom cognitive and psychiatric
      outcomes are assessed with standardized measures semi-annually for up to 5 years.
      We report baseline characteristics of the cohort and outcomes at 1 month. At
      enrollment, CM cases were more likely to come from families with fewer
      socioeconomic resources and to have health characteristics that increase risk for
      malaria. In children younger than 5 years, cases were delayed in motor, language,
      and social development by approximately 6 months, compared with controls. More
      significant delays occurred in those with MRI abnormalities at the 1-month
      follow-up visit. There were no differences between cases and controls in
      inhibitory self-control, nor in cognitive function in children >/= 5 years of
      age. The latter finding may be related to the smaller sample size, case-control
      imbalance in socioeconomic status, or the use of cognitive and behavioral
      assessments that are less culturally appropriate to this population. Continued
      follow-up will help determine predictors of long-term outcomes.
FAU - Brim, Rachel
AU  - Brim R
AD  - Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, College of Osteopathic Medicine,
      Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.
FAU - Mboma, Sebastian
AU  - Mboma S
AD  - Blantyre Malaria Project, University of Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre,
      Malawi.
FAU - Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret
AU  - Semrud-Clikeman M
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
FAU - Kampondeni, Sam
AU  - Kampondeni S
AD  - Blantyre Malaria Project, University of Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre,
      Malawi.
FAU - Magen, Jed
AU  - Magen J
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, Michigan.
FAU - Taylor, Terrie
AU  - Taylor T
AD  - Blantyre Malaria Project, University of Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre,
      Malawi.
AD  - Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, College of Osteopathic Medicine,
      Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.
FAU - Langfitt, John
AU  - Langfitt J
AD  - Department of Neurology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Trop Med Hyg
JT  - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
JID - 0370507
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Case-Control Studies
MH  - Child
MH  - Child Development
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Cognitive Dysfunction/*etiology
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Longitudinal Studies
MH  - Malaria, Cerebral/*complications
MH  - Male
MH  - Retinal Diseases/*etiology/parasitology
PMC - PMC5508917
EDAT- 2017/07/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/19 06:00
PMCR- 2018/07/12
AID - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0020 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Jul;97(1):225-231. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0020.