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Malaria-Related Hospitalizations in the United States, 2000-2014.

Abstract Few data are available on the burden of malaria hospitalization in the United States. Study of malaria using hospital-based data can better define the impact of malaria and help inform prevention efforts. U.S. malaria cases identified from hospitalization discharge records in the 2000-2014 Nationwide Inpatient Sample were examined. Frequencies and population rates were reported by demographics, infecting species, clinical, financial, institutional, geographic, and seasonal characteristics, and disparities were identified. Time trends in malaria cases were assessed using negative binomial regression. From 2000 to 2014, there were an estimated 22,029 malaria-related hospitalizations (4.88 per 1 million population) in the United States, including 182 in-hospital deaths and 4,823 severe malaria cases. The rate of malaria-related hospitalizations did not change significantly over the study period. The largest number of malaria-related hospitalizations occurred in August. Malaria-related hospitalizations occurred disproportionately among patients who were male, black, or 25-44 years of age. Plasmodium falciparum accounted for the majority of malaria-related hospitalizations. On average, malaria patients were hospitalized for 4.36 days with charges of $25,789. Patients with a malaria diagnosis were more often hospitalized in the Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic census divisions, urban teaching, private not-for-profit, and large-bed-size hospitals. Malaria imposes a substantial disease burden in the United States. Enhanced primary and secondary prevention measures, including strategies to increase the use of pretravel consultations and prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed.
PMID
Related Publications

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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the american journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28719326
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170718
DCOM- 20170731
LR  - 20170731
IS  - 1476-1645 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-9637 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - Malaria-Related Hospitalizations in the United States, 2000-2014.
PG  - 213-221
LID - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0101 [doi]
AB  - Few data are available on the burden of malaria hospitalization in the United
      States. Study of malaria using hospital-based data can better define the impact
      of malaria and help inform prevention efforts. U.S. malaria cases identified from
      hospitalization discharge records in the 2000-2014 Nationwide Inpatient Sample
      were examined. Frequencies and population rates were reported by demographics,
      infecting species, clinical, financial, institutional, geographic, and seasonal
      characteristics, and disparities were identified. Time trends in malaria cases
      were assessed using negative binomial regression. From 2000 to 2014, there were
      an estimated 22,029 malaria-related hospitalizations (4.88 per 1 million
      population) in the United States, including 182 in-hospital deaths and 4,823
      severe malaria cases. The rate of malaria-related hospitalizations did not change
      significantly over the study period. The largest number of malaria-related
      hospitalizations occurred in August. Malaria-related hospitalizations occurred
      disproportionately among patients who were male, black, or 25-44 years of age.
      Plasmodium falciparum accounted for the majority of malaria-related
      hospitalizations. On average, malaria patients were hospitalized for 4.36 days
      with charges of $25,789. Patients with a malaria diagnosis were more often
      hospitalized in the Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic census divisions, urban
      teaching, private not-for-profit, and large-bed-size hospitals. Malaria imposes a
      substantial disease burden in the United States. Enhanced primary and secondary
      prevention measures, including strategies to increase the use of pretravel
      consultations and prompt diagnosis and treatment are needed.
FAU - Khuu, Diana
AU  - Khuu D
AD  - Research, Epidemiology, and Evaluation Unit, Clinical Services and Research
      Branch, Substance Abuse Prevention and Control, Los Angeles County Department of 
      Public Health, Alhambra, California.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Eberhard, Mark L
AU  - Eberhard ML
AD  - Parasitic Diseases Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for
      Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Bristow, Benjamin N
AU  - Bristow BN
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Javanbakht, Marjan
AU  - Javanbakht M
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Ash, Lawrence R
AU  - Ash LR
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Shafir, Shira C
AU  - Shafir SC
AD  - TOMS Shoes, LLC, Los Angeles, California.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Sorvillo, Frank J
AU  - Sorvillo FJ
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Trop Med Hyg
JT  - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
JID - 0370507
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Female
MH  - Hospitalization
MH  - Humans
MH  - Malaria/*classification/epidemiology/parasitology/*pathology
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5508921
EDAT- 2017/07/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/19 06:00
PMCR- 2018/07/12
AID - 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0101 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Jul;97(1):213-221. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.17-0101.