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Burnout in Orthopaedic Surgeons: A Challenge for Leaders, Learners, and Colleagues: AOA Critical Issues.

Abstract Burnout, depression, suicidal ideation, and dissatisfaction with work-life balance have been reported in all medical specialties and at all stages of medical education and practice experience. Burnout consists of progressive emotional, attitudinal, and physical exhaustion. Physicians with burnout may treat patients as objects and feel emotionally depleted. Burnout is characterized by a loss of enthusiasm for work (emotional exhaustion), feelings of cynicism (depersonalization), and a low sense of personal accomplishment. The most complete study of emotional burnout among different medical specialties demonstrated that orthopaedic surgery is one of the specialties with the highest burnout rate. Qualitative descriptive studies are available. There was a 45.8% burnout rate among physicians in the U.S. in 2012, and a 2014 update suggested even higher rates. Burnout has a correlation with medical education. Burnout rates are similar to those in the general population when medical students enter school, and increase steadily through medical education prior to residency. Burnout rates in residents are high, reported to be between 41% and 74% across multiple specialties. This impacts our young physician workforce in orthopaedics. The purpose of this review is to provide the available information that characterizes burnout and addresses the issues inherent to preventing burnout, and to build awareness in orthopaedic surgeons. Wellness "goes beyond merely the absence of distress and includes being challenged, thriving, and achieving success in various aspects of personal and professional life." The challenge for the orthopaedic community is to develop interventions and strategies that are personalized to the individuals in this specialty.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the journal of bone and joint surgery. american volume
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28719565
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170718
DCOM- 20170905
LR  - 20170906
IS  - 1535-1386 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-9355 (Linking)
VI  - 99
IP  - 14
DP  - 2017 Jul 19
TI  - Burnout in Orthopaedic Surgeons: A Challenge for Leaders, Learners, and
      Colleagues: AOA Critical Issues.
PG  - e78
LID - 10.2106/JBJS.16.01215 [doi]
AB  - Burnout, depression, suicidal ideation, and dissatisfaction with work-life
      balance have been reported in all medical specialties and at all stages of
      medical education and practice experience. Burnout consists of progressive
      emotional, attitudinal, and physical exhaustion. Physicians with burnout may
      treat patients as objects and feel emotionally depleted. Burnout is characterized
      by a loss of enthusiasm for work (emotional exhaustion), feelings of cynicism
      (depersonalization), and a low sense of personal accomplishment. The most
      complete study of emotional burnout among different medical specialties
      demonstrated that orthopaedic surgery is one of the specialties with the highest 
      burnout rate. Qualitative descriptive studies are available. There was a 45.8%
      burnout rate among physicians in the U.S. in 2012, and a 2014 update suggested
      even higher rates. Burnout has a correlation with medical education. Burnout
      rates are similar to those in the general population when medical students enter 
      school, and increase steadily through medical education prior to residency.
      Burnout rates in residents are high, reported to be between 41% and 74% across
      multiple specialties. This impacts our young physician workforce in orthopaedics.
      The purpose of this review is to provide the available information that
      characterizes burnout and addresses the issues inherent to preventing burnout,
      and to build awareness in orthopaedic surgeons. Wellness "goes beyond merely the 
      absence of distress and includes being challenged, thriving, and achieving
      success in various aspects of personal and professional life." The challenge for 
      the orthopaedic community is to develop interventions and strategies that are
      personalized to the individuals in this specialty.
FAU - Ames, S Elizabeth
AU  - Ames SE
AD  - 1Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Vermont College of 
      Medicine, Burlington, Vermont 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 
      California 3Department of Orthopaedics, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker
      M.D. School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan 4Department of Orthopaedics, West
      Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia.
FAU - Cowan, James B
AU  - Cowan JB
FAU - Kenter, Keith
AU  - Kenter K
FAU - Emery, Sanford
AU  - Emery S
FAU - Halsey, David
AU  - Halsey D
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - J Bone Joint Surg Am
JT  - The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
JID - 0014030
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Burnout, Professional/*etiology/prevention & control
MH  - Career Choice
MH  - Health Education
MH  - Humans
MH  - Internship and Residency
MH  - Job Satisfaction
MH  - Orthopedic Surgeons/*psychology
MH  - Physician Impairment/psychology
MH  - Students, Medical/psychology
EDAT- 2017/07/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/19 06:00
AID - 10.2106/JBJS.16.01215 [doi]
AID - 00004623-201707190-00012 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2017 Jul 19;99(14):e78. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.16.01215.