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Surveillance for Silicosis Deaths Among Persons Aged 15-44 Years - United States, 1999-2015.

Abstract Silicosis is usually a disease of long latency affecting mostly older workers; therefore, silicosis deaths in young adults (aged 15-44 years) suggests acute or accelerated disease.* To understand the circumstances surrounding silicosis deaths among young persons, CDC analyzed the underlying and contributing causes(†) of death using multiple cause-of-death data (1999-2015) and industry and occupation information abstracted from death certificates (1999-2013). During 1999-2015, among 55 pneumoconiosis deaths of young adults with International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code J62 (pneumoconiosis due to dust containing silica),(§) 38 (69%) had code J62.8 (pneumoconiosis due to other dust containing silica), and 17 (31%) had code J62.0 (pneumoconiosis due to talc dust) listed on their death certificate. Decedents whose cause of death code was J62.8 most frequently worked in the manufacturing and construction industries and production occupations where silica exposure is known to occur. Among the 17 decedents who had death certificates listing code J62.0 as cause of death, 13 had certificates with an underlying or a contributing cause of death code listed that indicated multiple drug use or drug overdose. In addition, 13 of the 17 death certificates listing code J62.0 as cause of death had information on decedent's industry and occupation; among the 13 decedents, none worked in talc exposure-associated jobs, suggesting that their talc exposure was nonoccupational. Examining detailed information on causes of death (including external causes) and industry and occupation of decedents is essential for identifying silicosis deaths associated with occupational exposures and reducing misclassification of silicosis mortality.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Population Surveillance

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28727677
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170720
DCOM- 20170724
LR  - 20170724
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 28
DP  - 2017 Jul 21
TI  - Surveillance for Silicosis Deaths Among Persons Aged 15-44 Years - United States,
      1999-2015.
PG  - 747-752
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6628a2 [doi]
AB  - Silicosis is usually a disease of long latency affecting mostly older workers;
      therefore, silicosis deaths in young adults (aged 15-44 years) suggests acute or 
      accelerated disease.* To understand the circumstances surrounding silicosis
      deaths among young persons, CDC analyzed the underlying and contributing
      causesdagger of death using multiple cause-of-death data (1999-2015) and industry
      and occupation information abstracted from death certificates (1999-2013). During
      1999-2015, among 55 pneumoconiosis deaths of young adults with International
      Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code J62 (pneumoconiosis due 
      to dust containing silica), section sign 38 (69%) had code J62.8 (pneumoconiosis 
      due to other dust containing silica), and 17 (31%) had code J62.0 (pneumoconiosis
      due to talc dust) listed on their death certificate. Decedents whose cause of
      death code was J62.8 most frequently worked in the manufacturing and construction
      industries and production occupations where silica exposure is known to occur.
      Among the 17 decedents who had death certificates listing code J62.0 as cause of 
      death, 13 had certificates with an underlying or a contributing cause of death
      code listed that indicated multiple drug use or drug overdose. In addition, 13 of
      the 17 death certificates listing code J62.0 as cause of death had information on
      decedent's industry and occupation; among the 13 decedents, none worked in talc
      exposure-associated jobs, suggesting that their talc exposure was
      nonoccupational. Examining detailed information on causes of death (including
      external causes) and industry and occupation of decedents is essential for
      identifying silicosis deaths associated with occupational exposures and reducing 
      misclassification of silicosis mortality.
FAU - Mazurek, Jacek M
AU  - Mazurek JM
AD  - Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and
      Health, CDC.
FAU - Wood, John M
AU  - Wood JM
AD  - Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and
      Health, CDC.
FAU - Schleiff, Patricia L
AU  - Schleiff PL
AD  - Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and
      Health, CDC.
FAU - Weissman, David N
AU  - Weissman DN
AD  - Respiratory Health Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and
      Health, CDC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170721
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Population Surveillance
MH  - Silicosis/*mortality
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/25 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/21 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6628a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Jul 21;66(28):747-752. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6628a2.