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Blur Adaptation to Central Retinal Disease.

Abstract The long-term, low-resolution vision experienced by individuals affected by retinal disease that causes central vision loss (CVL) may change their perception of blur through adaptation. This study used a short-term adaptation paradigm to evaluate adaptation to blur and sharpness in patients with CVL.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title investigative ophthalmology & visual science
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28728172
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170720
DCOM- 20170728
LR  - 20170728
IS  - 1552-5783 (Electronic)
IS  - 0146-0404 (Linking)
VI  - 58
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Jul 01
TI  - Blur Adaptation to Central Retinal Disease.
PG  - 3646-3655
LID - 10.1167/iovs.16-20849 [doi]
AB  - Purpose: The long-term, low-resolution vision experienced by individuals affected
      by retinal disease that causes central vision loss (CVL) may change their
      perception of blur through adaptation. This study used a short-term adaptation
      paradigm to evaluate adaptation to blur and sharpness in patients with CVL.
      Methods: A variation of Webster's procedure was used to measure the point of
      subjective neutrality (PSN). The image that appeared normal after adaptation to
      each of seven blur and sharpness levels (PSN) was measured in 12 patients with
      CVL (20/60 to 20/320) and 5 subjects with normal sight (NS). Patients with CVL
      used a preferred retinal locus to view the images. Small control studies
      investigated the effects of long-term and medium-term (1 hour) defocus and
      diffusive blur. Results: Adaptation was reliably measured in patients with CVL
      and in the peripheral vision of NS subjects. The shape of adaptation curves was
      similar in patients with CVL and both central and peripheral vision of NS
      subjects. No statistical correlations were found between adaptation and age,
      visual acuity, retinal eccentricity, or contrast sensitivity. Long-term blur
      experience by a non-CVL myopic participant caused a shift in the adaptation
      function. Conversely, medium-term adaptation did not cause a shift in the
      adaptation function. Conclusions: Blur and sharp short-term adaptation occurred
      in peripheral vision of normal and diseased retinas. In most patients with CVL,
      neither adaptation nor blur perception was affected by long-term attention to
      peripheral low-resolution vision. The impact of blur/sharp adaptation on the
      benefit of image enhancement techniques for patients with CVL is discussed.
FAU - Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A
AU  - Vera-Diaz FA
AD  - New England College of Optometry, Boston, Massachusetts, United States 2Schepens 
      Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, Massachusetts,
      United States 3Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States.
FAU - Woods, Russell L
AU  - Woods RL
AD  - Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States 3Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical
      School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
FAU - Peli, Eli
AU  - Peli E
AD  - New England College of Optometry, Boston, Massachusetts, United States 2Schepens 
      Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, Massachusetts,
      United States 3Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States.
LA  - eng
GR  - R24 EY012890/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 EY005957/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 EY016093/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 EY019100/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P30 EY003790/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 EY012890/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci
JT  - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
JID - 7703701
SB  - IM
MH  - Adaptation, Ocular/*physiology
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Contrast Sensitivity/*physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Myopia/*physiopathology
MH  - Refraction, Ocular/physiology
MH  - Retinal Diseases/*physiopathology
MH  - Vision Disorders/*physiopathology
MH  - Visual Acuity
MH  - Visual Perception/*physiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5520677
EDAT- 2017/07/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/21 06:00
AID - 2645723 [pii]
AID - 10.1167/iovs.16-20849 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2017 Jul 1;58(9):3646-3655. doi:
      10.1167/iovs.16-20849.