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Committee Opinion No. 711: Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy.

Abstract Opioid use in pregnancy has escalated dramatically in recent years, paralleling the epidemic observed in the general population. To combat the opioid epidemic, all health care providers need to take an active role. Pregnancy provides an important opportunity to identify and treat women with substance use disorders. Substance use disorders affect women across all racial and ethnic groups and all socioeconomic groups, and affect women in rural, urban, and suburban populations. Therefore, it is essential that screening be universal. Screening for substance use should be a part of comprehensive obstetric care and should be done at the first prenatal visit in partnership with the pregnant woman. Patients who use opioids during pregnancy represent a diverse group, and it is important to recognize and differentiate between opioid use in the context of medical care, opioid misuse, and untreated opioid use disorder. Multidisciplinary long-term follow-up should include medical, developmental, and social support. Infants born to women who used opioids during pregnancy should be monitored for neonatal abstinence syndrome by a pediatric care provider. Early universal screening, brief intervention (such as engaging a patient in a short conversation, providing feedback and advice), and referral for treatment of pregnant women with opioid use and opioid use disorder improve maternal and infant outcomes. In general, a coordinated multidisciplinary approach without criminal sanctions has the best chance of helping infants and families.
PMID
Related Publications

Opioid Use in Pregnancy, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, and Childhood Outcomes: Executive Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Pediatrics, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the March of Dimes Foundation.

Clinical care for opioid-using pregnant and postpartum women: the role of obstetric providers.

Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy: Health Policy and Practice in the Midst of an Epidemic.

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Committee Opinion No. 711 Summary: Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title obstetrics and gynecology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28742676
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170725
DCOM- 20170809
LR  - 20170809
IS  - 1873-233X (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-7844 (Linking)
VI  - 130
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Committee Opinion No. 711: Opioid Use and Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy.
PG  - e81-e94
LID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002235 [doi]
AB  - Opioid use in pregnancy has escalated dramatically in recent years, paralleling
      the epidemic observed in the general population. To combat the opioid epidemic,
      all health care providers need to take an active role. Pregnancy provides an
      important opportunity to identify and treat women with substance use disorders.
      Substance use disorders affect women across all racial and ethnic groups and all 
      socioeconomic groups, and affect women in rural, urban, and suburban populations.
      Therefore, it is essential that screening be universal. Screening for substance
      use should be a part of comprehensive obstetric care and should be done at the
      first prenatal visit in partnership with the pregnant woman. Patients who use
      opioids during pregnancy represent a diverse group, and it is important to
      recognize and differentiate between opioid use in the context of medical care,
      opioid misuse, and untreated opioid use disorder. Multidisciplinary long-term
      follow-up should include medical, developmental, and social support. Infants born
      to women who used opioids during pregnancy should be monitored for neonatal
      abstinence syndrome by a pediatric care provider. Early universal screening,
      brief intervention (such as engaging a patient in a short conversation, providing
      feedback and advice), and referral for treatment of pregnant women with opioid
      use and opioid use disorder improve maternal and infant outcomes. In general, a
      coordinated multidisciplinary approach without criminal sanctions has the best
      chance of helping infants and families.
CN  - Committee on Obstetric Practice
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Practice Guideline
PL  - United States
TA  - Obstet Gynecol
JT  - Obstetrics and gynecology
JID - 0401101
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Obstetrics/*standards
MH  - Opioid-Related Disorders/*prevention & control
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications/*prevention & control
MH  - Prenatal Care/*standards
IR  - Mascola MA
FIR - Mascola, Maria A
IR  - Borders AE
FIR - Borders, Ann E
IR  - Terplan M
FIR - Terplan, Mishka
EDAT- 2017/07/26 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/26 06:00
AID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002235 [doi]
AID - 00006250-201708000-00056 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Aug;130(2):e81-e94. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002235.