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Participation of women and children in hunting activities in Sierra Leone and implications for control of zoonotic infections.

Abstract The emergence of infectious diseases of zoonotic origin highlights the need to understand social practices at the animal-human interface. This study provides a qualitative account of interactions between humans and wild animals in predominantly Mende villages of southern Sierra Leone. We conducted fieldwork over 4 months including participant and direct observations, semi-structured interviews (n = 47), spontaneously occurring focus group discussions (n = 12), school essays and informal interviews to describe behaviours that may serve as pathways for zoonotic infection. In this region, hunting is the primary form of contact with wild animals. We describe how these interactions are shaped by socio-cultural contexts, including opportunities to access economic resources and by social obligations and constraints. Our research suggests that the potential for exposure to zoonotic pathogens is more widely distributed across different age, gender and social groups than previously appreciated. We highlight the role of children in hunting, an age group that has previously not been discussed in the context of hunting. The breadth of the "at risk" population forces reconsideration of how we conceptualize, trace and monitor pathogen exposure.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos neglected tropical diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28749933
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170727
DCOM- 20170808
LR  - 20170808
IS  - 1935-2735 (Electronic)
IS  - 1935-2727 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Jul
TI  - Participation of women and children in hunting activities in Sierra Leone and
      implications for control of zoonotic infections.
PG  - e0005699
LID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005699 [doi]
AB  - The emergence of infectious diseases of zoonotic origin highlights the need to
      understand social practices at the animal-human interface. This study provides a 
      qualitative account of interactions between humans and wild animals in
      predominantly Mende villages of southern Sierra Leone. We conducted fieldwork
      over 4 months including participant and direct observations, semi-structured
      interviews (n = 47), spontaneously occurring focus group discussions (n = 12),
      school essays and informal interviews to describe behaviours that may serve as
      pathways for zoonotic infection. In this region, hunting is the primary form of
      contact with wild animals. We describe how these interactions are shaped by
      socio-cultural contexts, including opportunities to access economic resources and
      by social obligations and constraints. Our research suggests that the potential
      for exposure to zoonotic pathogens is more widely distributed across different
      age, gender and social groups than previously appreciated. We highlight the role 
      of children in hunting, an age group that has previously not been discussed in
      the context of hunting. The breadth of the "at risk" population forces
      reconsideration of how we conceptualize, trace and monitor pathogen exposure.
FAU - Bonwitt, Jesse
AU  - Bonwitt J
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0510-2802
AD  - Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom.
FAU - Kandeh, Martin
AU  - Kandeh M
AD  - Department of Social Sciences, Njala University, Bo, Sierra Leone.
FAU - Dawson, Michael
AU  - Dawson M
AD  - Mercy Hospital Research Laboratory, Bo, Sierra Leone.
FAU - Ansumana, Rashid
AU  - Ansumana R
AD  - Mercy Hospital Research Laboratory, Bo, Sierra Leone.
FAU - Sahr, Foday
AU  - Sahr F
AD  - Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences,
      University of Sierra Leone, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
FAU - Kelly, Ann H
AU  - Kelly AH
AD  - Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, King's College London, London,
      United Kingdom.
FAU - Brown, Hannah
AU  - Brown H
AD  - Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170727
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis
JT  - PLoS neglected tropical diseases
JID - 101291488
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Animals
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Communicable Disease Control/*methods
MH  - Disease Transmission, Infectious/*prevention & control
MH  - Epidemiological Monitoring
MH  - Female
MH  - Human Activities
MH  - Humans
MH  - Interviews as Topic
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Sierra Leone
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zoonoses/*prevention & control
PMC - PMC5531371
EDAT- 2017/07/28 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/28 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/03 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/10 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005699 [doi]
AID - PNTD-D-17-00251 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Jul 27;11(7):e0005699. doi:
      10.1371/journal.pntd.0005699. eCollection 2017 Jul.