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Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence.

Abstract Probiotics contain microorganisms, most of which are bacteria similar to the beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut. Probiotics have been widely studied in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. The most-studied species include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces. However, a lack of clear guidelines on when to use probiotics and the most effective probiotic for different gastrointestinal conditions may be confusing for family physicians and their patients. Probiotics have an important role in the maintenance of immunologic equilibrium in the gastrointestinal tract through the direct interaction with immune cells. Probiotic effectiveness can be species-, dose-, and disease-specific, and the duration of therapy depends on the clinical indication. There is high-quality evidence that probiotics are effective for acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile- associated diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Conversely, there is evidence that probiotics are not effective for acute pancreatitis and Crohn disease. Probiotics are safe for infants, children, adults, and older patients, but caution is advised in immunologically vulnerable populations.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title american family physician
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28762696
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170801
DCOM- 20170807
LR  - 20170807
IS  - 1532-0650 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-838X (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Aug 01
TI  - Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence.
PG  - 170-178
AB  - Probiotics contain microorganisms, most of which are bacteria similar to the
      beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut. Probiotics have been
      widely studied in a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. The most-studied
      species include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces. However, a
      lack of clear guidelines on when to use probiotics and the most effective
      probiotic for different gastrointestinal conditions may be confusing for family
      physicians and their patients. Probiotics have an important role in the
      maintenance of immunologic equilibrium in the gastrointestinal tract through the 
      direct interaction with immune cells. Probiotic effectiveness can be species-,
      dose-, and disease-specific, and the duration of therapy depends on the clinical 
      indication. There is high-quality evidence that probiotics are effective for
      acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile-
      associated diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel 
      syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and necrotizing enterocolitis.
      Conversely, there is evidence that probiotics are not effective for acute
      pancreatitis and Crohn disease. Probiotics are safe for infants, children,
      adults, and older patients, but caution is advised in immunologically vulnerable 
      populations.
FAU - Wilkins, Thad
AU  - Wilkins T
AD  - Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA.
FAU - Sequoia, Jacqueline
AU  - Sequoia J
AD  - William Jennings Bryan Dorn VA Medical Center, Columbia, SC, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Am Fam Physician
JT  - American family physician
JID - 1272646
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Diarrhea/therapy
MH  - Gastrointestinal Diseases/*therapy
MH  - Humans
MH  - Probiotics/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use
EDAT- 2017/08/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/02 06:00
AID - d12929 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am Fam Physician. 2017 Aug 1;96(3):170-178.