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Trends in Oral Diseases in the U.S. Population.

Abstract This article reviews trends in dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss for the United States along with population dynamics and risk factors that might influence these trends going forward. Dental caries experience remains high in the primary dentition. Caries severity in permanent teeth of children has declined to historically low levels, and long-standing inequalities in untreated caries appear to be narrowing. Declines in caries severity of children's permanent teeth have stabilized at a low level, but likely will contribute to future reductions in dental caries severity in adults. The prevalence of periodontal disease is high in adults, and only a small percentage have severe forms of the disease. Countervailing trends in determinants would suggest little change in the prevalence of periodontal disease in the future, but the lack of an obvious trend over the last two decades makes projections uncertain. Tooth loss as a consequence of dental disease has declined markedly over the last half century and has been all but eliminated in high-income groups. However, notable exceptions to these favorable trends are evident. Progress in prevention policies and programs that affect disease experience appears slower than progress in meeting population-level caries treatment needs. Clearly, long-standing inequities related to political and social determinants remain for all dental diseases, and income disparities in dental disease are widening for some indicators. Growing inequalities raise ethical and public health concerns that should be prominent in discussions of dental workforce needs and strategies for the next 25 years. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

dental caries

dental disease projections

periodontal diseases

population dynamics

tooth loss

trends in disease

Journal Title journal of dental education
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28765461
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170802
DCOM- 20170905
LR  - 20170906
IS  - 1930-7837 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-0337 (Linking)
VI  - 81
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Trends in Oral Diseases in the U.S. Population.
PG  - eS97-eS109
LID - 10.21815/JDE.017.016 [doi]
AB  - This article reviews trends in dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss
      for the United States along with population dynamics and risk factors that might 
      influence these trends going forward. Dental caries experience remains high in
      the primary dentition. Caries severity in permanent teeth of children has
      declined to historically low levels, and long-standing inequalities in untreated 
      caries appear to be narrowing. Declines in caries severity of children's
      permanent teeth have stabilized at a low level, but likely will contribute to
      future reductions in dental caries severity in adults. The prevalence of
      periodontal disease is high in adults, and only a small percentage have severe
      forms of the disease. Countervailing trends in determinants would suggest little 
      change in the prevalence of periodontal disease in the future, but the lack of an
      obvious trend over the last two decades makes projections uncertain. Tooth loss
      as a consequence of dental disease has declined markedly over the last half
      century and has been all but eliminated in high-income groups. However, notable
      exceptions to these favorable trends are evident. Progress in prevention policies
      and programs that affect disease experience appears slower than progress in
      meeting population-level caries treatment needs. Clearly, long-standing
      inequities related to political and social determinants remain for all dental
      diseases, and income disparities in dental disease are widening for some
      indicators. Growing inequalities raise ethical and public health concerns that
      should be prominent in discussions of dental workforce needs and strategies for
      the next 25 years. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing
      Dental Education in the 21st Century."
FAU - Rozier, R Gary
AU  - Rozier RG
AD  - Dr. Rozier is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings
      School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. 
      White is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of 
      Global Public Health, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry,
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Dr. Slade is with the Department
      of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel
      Hill. [email protected]
FAU - White, B Alexander
AU  - White BA
AD  - Dr. Rozier is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings
      School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. 
      White is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of 
      Global Public Health, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry,
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Dr. Slade is with the Department
      of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel
      Hill.
FAU - Slade, Gary D
AU  - Slade GD
AD  - Dr. Rozier is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings
      School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dr. 
      White is with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of 
      Global Public Health, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry,
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Dr. Slade is with the Department
      of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel
      Hill.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Dent Educ
JT  - Journal of dental education
JID - 8000150
SB  - D
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Child
MH  - Dental Caries/*epidemiology
MH  - Dental Health Surveys
MH  - Dentition, Permanent
MH  - Humans
MH  - Oral Health/trends
MH  - Periodontal Diseases/*epidemiology
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Tooth Loss/*epidemiology
MH  - Tooth, Deciduous
MH  - United States/epidemiology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - dental caries
OT  - dental disease projections
OT  - periodontal diseases
OT  - population dynamics
OT  - tooth loss
OT  - trends in disease
EDAT- 2017/08/03 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/03 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/05 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/21 [accepted]
AID - 81/8/eS97 [pii]
AID - 10.21815/JDE.017.016 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Dent Educ. 2017 Aug;81(8):eS97-eS109. doi: 10.21815/JDE.017.016.