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Meningitis Outbreak Caused by Vaccine-Preventable Bacterial Pathogens - Northern Ghana, 2016.

Abstract Bacterial meningitis is a severe, acute infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord that can rapidly lead to death. Even with recommended antibiotic treatment, up to 25% of infected persons in Africa might experience neurologic sequelae (1). Three regions in northern Ghana (Upper East, Northern, and Upper West), located in the sub-Saharan "meningitis belt" that extends from Senegal to Ethiopia, experienced periodic outbreaks of meningitis before introduction of serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac) in 2012 (2,3). During December 9, 2015-February 16, 2016, a total of 432 suspected meningitis cases were reported to health authorities in these three regions. The Ghana Ministry of Health, with assistance from CDC and other partners, tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 286 patients. In the first 4 weeks of the outbreak, a high percentage of cases were caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae; followed by an increase in cases caused by Neisseria meningitidis, predominantly serogroup W. These data facilitated Ghana's request to the International Coordinating Group* for meningococcal polysaccharide ACW vaccine, which was delivered to persons in the most affected districts. Rapid identification of the etiologic agent causing meningitis outbreaks is critical to inform targeted public health and clinical interventions, including vaccination, clinical management, and contact precautions.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Disease Outbreaks

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28771457
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170803
DCOM- 20170808
LR  - 20170808
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 30
DP  - 2017 Aug 04
TI  - Meningitis Outbreak Caused by Vaccine-Preventable Bacterial Pathogens - Northern 
      Ghana, 2016.
PG  - 806-810
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6630a2 [doi]
AB  - Bacterial meningitis is a severe, acute infection of the fluid surrounding the
      brain and spinal cord that can rapidly lead to death. Even with recommended
      antibiotic treatment, up to 25% of infected persons in Africa might experience
      neurologic sequelae (1). Three regions in northern Ghana (Upper East, Northern,
      and Upper West), located in the sub-Saharan "meningitis belt" that extends from
      Senegal to Ethiopia, experienced periodic outbreaks of meningitis before
      introduction of serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac) in 2012 
      (2,3). During December 9, 2015-February 16, 2016, a total of 432 suspected
      meningitis cases were reported to health authorities in these three regions. The 
      Ghana Ministry of Health, with assistance from CDC and other partners, tested
      cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 286 patients. In the first 4 weeks of
      the outbreak, a high percentage of cases were caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae;
      followed by an increase in cases caused by Neisseria meningitidis, predominantly 
      serogroup W. These data facilitated Ghana's request to the International
      Coordinating Group* for meningococcal polysaccharide ACW vaccine, which was
      delivered to persons in the most affected districts. Rapid identification of the 
      etiologic agent causing meningitis outbreaks is critical to inform targeted
      public health and clinical interventions, including vaccination, clinical
      management, and contact precautions.
FAU - Aku, Fortress Y
AU  - Aku FY
FAU - Lessa, Fernanda C
AU  - Lessa FC
FAU - Asiedu-Bekoe, Franklin
AU  - Asiedu-Bekoe F
FAU - Balagumyetime, Phoebe
AU  - Balagumyetime P
FAU - Ofosu, Winfred
AU  - Ofosu W
FAU - Farrar, Jennifer
AU  - Farrar J
FAU - Ouattara, Mahamoudou
AU  - Ouattara M
FAU - Vuong, Jeni T
AU  - Vuong JT
FAU - Issah, Kofi
AU  - Issah K
FAU - Opare, Joseph
AU  - Opare J
FAU - Ohene, Sally-Ann
AU  - Ohene SA
FAU - Okot, Charles
AU  - Okot C
FAU - Kenu, Ernest
AU  - Kenu E
FAU - Ameme, Donne K
AU  - Ameme DK
FAU - Opare, David
AU  - Opare D
FAU - Abdul-Karim, Abass
AU  - Abdul-Karim A
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170804
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
RN  - 0 (Meningococcal Vaccines)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Cerebrospinal Fluid/microbiology
MH  - Child
MH  - *Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control
MH  - Female
MH  - Ghana/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Meningitis, Bacterial/*epidemiology/*microbiology/prevention & control
MH  - Meningococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage
MH  - Neisseria meningitidis/isolation & purification
MH  - Streptococcus pneumoniae/isolation & purification
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/04 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6630a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Aug 4;66(30):806-810. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6630a2.