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Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos neglected tropical diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28783750
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
DA  - 20170807
LR  - 20170807
IS  - 1935-2735 (Electronic)
IS  - 1935-2727 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Aug 04
TI  - Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.
PG  - e0005697
LID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005697 [doi]
AB  - Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 produces septicemia in infants in
      sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences
      between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting
      data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve 
      these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19
      strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50)
      was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice.
      For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various
      time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19
      and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial
      burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected
      mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had
      significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. 
      ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while
      ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had
      higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest
      that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice.
      The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that 
      ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.
FAU - Ramachandran, Girish
AU  - Ramachandran G
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Panda, Aruna
AU  - Panda A
AD  - Department of Pathology, Program of Comparative Medicine, University of Maryland 
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Higginson, Ellen E
AU  - Higginson EE
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Ateh, Eugene
AU  - Ateh E
AD  - Department of Pathology, Program of Comparative Medicine, University of Maryland 
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine,
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Lipsky, Michael M
AU  - Lipsky MM
AD  - Department of Pathology, Program of Comparative Medicine, University of Maryland 
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Sen, Sunil
AU  - Sen S
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Matson, Courtney A
AU  - Matson CA
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Permala-Booth, Jasnehta
AU  - Permala-Booth J
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - DeTolla, Louis J
AU  - DeTolla LJ
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Pathology, Program of Comparative Medicine, University of Maryland 
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Tennant, Sharon M
AU  - Tennant SM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0760-6665
AD  - Center for Vaccine Development and Institute for Global Health, University of
      Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,
      Maryland, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170804
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis
JT  - PLoS neglected tropical diseases
JID - 101291488
EDAT- 2017/08/08 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/08 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/10 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/09 [accepted]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005697 [doi]
AID - PNTD-D-17-00010 [pii]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Aug 4;11(8):e0005697. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005697.