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The microbiome in urogenital schistosomiasis and induced bladder pathologies.

Abstract Human schistosomiasis is a highly prevalent neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by Schistosoma species. Research on the molecular mechanisms influencing the outcomes of bladder infection by Schistosoma haematobium is urgently needed to develop new diagnostics, therapeutics and infection prevention strategies. The objective of the research study was to determine the microbiome features and changes in urine during urogenital schistosomiasis and induced bladder pathologies.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Microbiota

Keywords
Journal Title plos neglected tropical diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28793309
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170809
DCOM- 20170901
LR  - 20170901
IS  - 1935-2735 (Electronic)
IS  - 1935-2727 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - The microbiome in urogenital schistosomiasis and induced bladder pathologies.
PG  - e0005826
LID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005826 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis is a highly prevalent neglected tropical
      disease (NTD) caused by Schistosoma species. Research on the molecular mechanisms
      influencing the outcomes of bladder infection by Schistosoma haematobium is
      urgently needed to develop new diagnostics, therapeutics and infection prevention
      strategies. The objective of the research study was to determine the microbiome
      features and changes in urine during urogenital schistosomiasis and induced
      bladder pathologies. METHODOLOGY: Seventy participants from Eggua, southwestern
      Nigeria provided morning urine samples and were screened for urogenital
      schistosomiasis infection and bladder pathologies in a cross-sectional study.
      Highthroughput NGS sequencing was carried out, targeting the 16S V3 region.
      Filtered reads were processed and analyzed in a bioinformatics pipeline.
      PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study participants (36 males and 34 females, between ages
      15 and 65) were categorized into four groups according to status of
      schistosomiasis infection and bladder pathology. Data analytics of the
      next-generation sequencing reads revealed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes
      dominated and had influence on microbiome structure of both non-infected persons 
      and persons with urogenital schistosomiasis. Furthermore, gender and age
      influenced taxa abundance independent of infection or bladder pathology. Several 
      taxa distinguished urogenital schistosomiasis induced bladder pathologies from
      urogenital schistosomiasis infection alone and from healthy persons, including
      known immune-stimulatory taxa such as Fusobacterium, Sphingobacterium and
      Enterococcus. Some of these significant taxa, especially Sphingobacterium were
      projected as markers of infection, while several genera including potentially
      beneficial taxa such as Trabulsiella and Weissella, were markers of the
      non-infected. Finally, expected changes in protein functional categories were
      observed to relate to cellular maintenance and lipid metabolism. CONCLUSION: The 
      urinary microbiome is a factor to be considered in developing biomarkers,
      diagnostic tools, and new treatment for urogenital schistosomiasis and induced
      bladder pathologies.
FAU - Adebayo, Adewale S
AU  - Adebayo AS
AD  - Cell Biology & Genetics Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan,
      Ibadan, Nigeria.
FAU - Survayanshi, Mangesh
AU  - Survayanshi M
AD  - National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India.
FAU - Bhute, Shrikanth
AU  - Bhute S
AD  - National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India.
FAU - Agunloye, Atinuke M
AU  - Agunloye AM
AD  - Department of Radiology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
FAU - Isokpehi, Raphael D
AU  - Isokpehi RD
AD  - Bethune-Cookman University, Daytona Beach, Florida, United States of America.
FAU - Anumudu, Chiaka I
AU  - Anumudu CI
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9444-685X
AD  - Cell Biology & Genetics Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan,
      Ibadan, Nigeria.
FAU - Shouche, Yogesh S
AU  - Shouche YS
AD  - National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170809
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis
JT  - PLoS neglected tropical diseases
JID - 101291488
RN  - 0 (DNA, Bacterial)
RN  - 0 (DNA, Ribosomal)
RN  - 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Bacteria/*classification/genetics/*isolation & purification
MH  - Cluster Analysis
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - DNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics
MH  - DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry/genetics
MH  - Female
MH  - High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Microbiota
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Nigeria
MH  - Phylogeny
MH  - RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
MH  - Schistosomiasis haematobia/*microbiology/*pathology
MH  - Sequence Analysis, DNA
MH  - Urinary Bladder/microbiology/*pathology
MH  - Urine/*microbiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5565189
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/31 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/21 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/21 [revised]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005826 [doi]
AID - PNTD-D-17-00137 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017 Aug 9;11(8):e0005826. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005826.
      eCollection 2017 Aug.