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Veterinary student competence in equine lameness recognition and assessment: a mixed methods study.

Abstract The development of perceptual skills is an important aspect of veterinary education. The authors investigated veterinary student competency in lameness evaluation at two stages, before (third year) and during (fourth/fifth year) clinical rotations. Students evaluated horses in videos, where horses were presented during trot on a straight line and in circles. Eye-tracking data were recorded during assessment on the straight line to follow student gaze. On completing the task, students filled in a structured questionnaire. Results showed that the experienced students outperformed inexperienced students, although even experienced students may classify one in four horses incorrectly. Mistakes largely arose from classifying an incorrect limb as lame. The correct detection of sound horses was at chance level. While the experienced student cohort primarily looked at upper body movement (head and sacrum) during lameness assessment, the inexperienced cohort focused on limb movement. Student self-assessment of performance was realistic, and task difficulty was most commonly rated between 3 and 4 out of 5. The inexperienced students named a considerably greater number of visual lameness features than the experienced students. Future dedicated training based on the findings presented here may help students to develop more reliable lameness assessment skills.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Clinical Competence

Education, Veterinary

Students, Medical

Keywords

equine lameness

eye tracking

gait scoring

horses

lameness examination

observer agreement

Journal Title the veterinary record
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28801497
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170812
DCOM- 20170815
LR  - 20170815
IS  - 2042-7670 (Electronic)
IS  - 0042-4900 (Linking)
VI  - 181
IP  - 7
DP  - 2017 Aug 12
TI  - Veterinary student competence in equine lameness recognition and assessment: a
      mixed methods study.
PG  - 168
LID - 10.1136/vr.104245 [doi]
AB  - The development of perceptual skills is an important aspect of veterinary
      education. The authors investigated veterinary student competency in lameness
      evaluation at two stages, before (third year) and during (fourth/fifth year)
      clinical rotations. Students evaluated horses in videos, where horses were
      presented during trot on a straight line and in circles. Eye-tracking data were
      recorded during assessment on the straight line to follow student gaze. On
      completing the task, students filled in a structured questionnaire. Results
      showed that the experienced students outperformed inexperienced students,
      although even experienced students may classify one in four horses incorrectly.
      Mistakes largely arose from classifying an incorrect limb as lame. The correct
      detection of sound horses was at chance level. While the experienced student
      cohort primarily looked at upper body movement (head and sacrum) during lameness 
      assessment, the inexperienced cohort focused on limb movement. Student
      self-assessment of performance was realistic, and task difficulty was most
      commonly rated between 3 and 4 out of 5. The inexperienced students named a
      considerably greater number of visual lameness features than the experienced
      students. Future dedicated training based on the findings presented here may help
      students to develop more reliable lameness assessment skills.
CI  - (c) British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the
      article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless
      otherwise expressly granted.
FAU - Starke, Sandra D
AU  - Starke SD
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1434-7094
AD  - The Royal Veterinary College,Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield,
      Hertfordshire, UK.
FAU - May, Stephen A
AU  - May SA
AD  - The Royal Veterinary College,Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield,
      Hertfordshire, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - Vet Rec
JT  - The Veterinary record
JID - 0031164
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - *Clinical Competence
MH  - *Education, Veterinary
MH  - Horse Diseases/*diagnosis
MH  - Horses
MH  - Humans
MH  - Lameness, Animal/*diagnosis
MH  - *Students, Medical
MH  - Videotape Recording
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - equine lameness
OT  - eye tracking
OT  - gait scoring
OT  - horses
OT  - lameness examination
OT  - observer agreement
EDAT- 2017/08/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/16 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/08 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/08 [revised]
PHST- 2017/06/11 [accepted]
AID - vr.104245 [pii]
AID - 10.1136/vr.104245 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Vet Rec. 2017 Aug 12;181(7):168. doi: 10.1136/vr.104245.