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Occupational Distribution of Campylobacteriosis and Salmonellosis Cases - Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia, 2014.

Abstract Campylobacter and Salmonella are leading causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States and are estimated to cause >1 million episodes of domestically acquired illness annually (1). Campylobacter and Salmonella are primarily transmitted through contaminated food, but animal-to-human and human-to-human transmission can also occur (2,3). Although occupationally acquired infections have been reported, occupational risk factors have rarely been studied. In 2015, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) identified 63 suspected or confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection over 3.5 years at a poultry-processing plant (Kathleen Fagan, OSHA, personal communication, December 2015); most involved new workers handling chickens in the "live hang" area where bacterial contamination is likely to be the highest. These findings were similar to those of a previous study of Campylobacter infections among workers at another poultry-processing plant (4). The investigation led to discussions among OSHA, state health departments, and CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); and a surveillance study was initiated to further explore the disease incidence in poultry-processing plant workers and identify any additional occupations at increased risk for common enteric infections. Deidentified reports of campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis among Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia residents aged ≥16 years were obtained and reviewed. Each employed patient was classified into one of 23 major occupational groups using the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system.* Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between each occupational group and each disease were calculated to identify occupations potentially at increased risk, contrasting each group with all other occupations. In 2014, a total of 2,977 campylobacteriosis and 2,259 salmonellosis cases were reported. Among the 1,772 (60%) campylobacteriosis and 1,516 (67%) salmonellosis cases in patients for whom occupational information was available, 1,064 (60%) and 847 (56%), respectively, were employed. Persons in farming, fishing, and forestry as well as health care and technical occupations were at significantly increased risk for both campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis compared with all other occupations. Targeting education and prevention strategies could help reduce disease, and improving the systematic collection of occupational information in disease surveillance systems could provide a better understanding of the extent of occupationally acquired diseases.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28817554
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170817
DCOM- 20170821
LR  - 20170821
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 32
DP  - 2017 Aug 18
TI  - Occupational Distribution of Campylobacteriosis and Salmonellosis Cases -
      Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia, 2014.
PG  - 850-853
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6632a4 [doi]
AB  - Campylobacter and Salmonella are leading causes of bacterial gastroenteritis in
      the United States and are estimated to cause >1 million episodes of domestically 
      acquired illness annually (1). Campylobacter and Salmonella are primarily
      transmitted through contaminated food, but animal-to-human and human-to-human
      transmission can also occur (2,3). Although occupationally acquired infections
      have been reported, occupational risk factors have rarely been studied. In 2015, 
      the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) identified 63 suspected 
      or confirmed cases of Campylobacter infection over 3.5 years at a
      poultry-processing plant (Kathleen Fagan, OSHA, personal communication, December 
      2015); most involved new workers handling chickens in the "live hang" area where 
      bacterial contamination is likely to be the highest. These findings were similar 
      to those of a previous study of Campylobacter infections among workers at another
      poultry-processing plant (4). The investigation led to discussions among OSHA,
      state health departments, and CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety
      and Health (NIOSH); and a surveillance study was initiated to further explore the
      disease incidence in poultry-processing plant workers and identify any additional
      occupations at increased risk for common enteric infections. Deidentified reports
      of campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis among Maryland, Ohio, and Virginia
      residents aged >/=16 years were obtained and reviewed. Each employed patient was 
      classified into one of 23 major occupational groups using the 2010 Standard
      Occupational Classification (SOC) system.* Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence
      intervals (CI) for associations between each occupational group and each disease 
      were calculated to identify occupations potentially at increased risk,
      contrasting each group with all other occupations. In 2014, a total of 2,977
      campylobacteriosis and 2,259 salmonellosis cases were reported. Among the 1,772
      (60%) campylobacteriosis and 1,516 (67%) salmonellosis cases in patients for whom
      occupational information was available, 1,064 (60%) and 847 (56%), respectively, 
      were employed. Persons in farming, fishing, and forestry as well as health care
      and technical occupations were at significantly increased risk for both
      campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis compared with all other occupations.
      Targeting education and prevention strategies could help reduce disease, and
      improving the systematic collection of occupational information in disease
      surveillance systems could provide a better understanding of the extent of
      occupationally acquired diseases.
FAU - Su, Chia-Ping
AU  - Su CP
FAU - de Perio, Marie A
AU  - de Perio MA
FAU - Fagan, Kathleen
AU  - Fagan K
FAU - Smith, Meghan L
AU  - Smith ML
FAU - Salehi, Ellen
AU  - Salehi E
FAU - Levine, Seth
AU  - Levine S
FAU - Gruszynski, Karen
AU  - Gruszynski K
FAU - Luckhaupt, Sara E
AU  - Luckhaupt SE
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170818
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Animals
MH  - Campylobacter Infections/*epidemiology
MH  - Chickens
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Maryland/epidemiology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology
MH  - Occupations/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Ohio/epidemiology
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Salmonella Infections/*epidemiology
MH  - Virginia/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/18 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/18 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6632a4 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Aug 18;66(32):850-853. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6632a4.