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Evaluation of the adverse drug reaction surveillance system Kadoma City, Zimbabwe 2015.

Abstract Medicines have the potential to cause adverse drug reactions and because of this Zimbabwe monitor reactions to medicines through the Adverse Drug Reaction Surveillance System. The Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe monitors reactions to medicines through the Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance System. The system relies on health professionals to report adverse drug reactions to maximize patient safety. We report results of an evaluation of the Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance System in Kadoma District.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice

Keywords

Adverse drug reactions

Kadoma

Zimbabwe

surveillance system

Journal Title the pan african medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28819477
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170818
DCOM- 20170904
LR  - 20170904
IS  - 1937-8688 (Electronic)
VI  - 27
DP  - 2017
TI  - Evaluation of the adverse drug reaction surveillance system Kadoma City, Zimbabwe
      2015.
PG  - 55
LID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.55.11090 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Medicines have the potential to cause adverse drug reactions and
      because of this Zimbabwe monitor reactions to medicines through the Adverse Drug 
      Reaction Surveillance System. The Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe
      monitors reactions to medicines through the Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance 
      System. The system relies on health professionals to report adverse drug
      reactions to maximize patient safety. We report results of an evaluation of the
      Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance System in Kadoma District. METHODS: A
      descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using the updated CDC guidelines 
      in six health facilities in Kadoma City. Data were collected using a pretested
      interviewer administered questionnaire, checklists and records review. Data was
      analyzed using Epi InfoTM to calculate frequencies and means. Qualitative data
      were analyzed manually. Written informed consent was obtained from all study
      participants. RESULTS: The surveillance system did not meet up to its objectives 
      as it failed to detect the adverse drug reactions and there was no monitoring of 
      increases in known events. Fewer than half (43%) of the participants were aware
      of at least 2 objectives of the surveillance system but 83% of health workers
      willing to participate. However the system was not acceptable, 79% did not
      perceive the system to be necessary with the majority saying ''why should we fill
      in the forms when the reactions were already known or minor''. Though the system 
      was supposed to identify potential patient risk factors for particular types of
      events health workers were reluctant to participate as evidenced by only one form
      filled out of 20 reactions experienced in the district. The system was simple as 
      the notification form has 16 fields which require easily obtainable information
      from the patient records. CONCLUSION: The surveillance system was not useful and 
      was not acceptable to health workers but was simple and stable. Health workers
      lacked knowledge. Sharing of results with the Medicines Control Authority of
      Zimbabwe through the Matrons facilitated training of health workers in Kadoma
      City. Health workers were encouraged to notify any drug reaction and to
      completely fill in the notification forms. Patients were also encouraged to
      report any drug reaction to health care workers.
FAU - Muringazuva, Caroline
AU  - Muringazuva C
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Chirundu, Daniel
AU  - Chirundu D
AD  - City Health Department, Kadoma City Council.
FAU - Mungati, More
AU  - Mungati M
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Shambira, Gerald
AU  - Shambira G
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Gombe, Notion
AU  - Gombe N
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Bangure, Donewell
AU  - Bangure D
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Juru, Tsitsi
AU  - Juru T
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
FAU - Tshimanga, Mufuta
AU  - Tshimanga M
AD  - Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Multicenter Study
DEP - 20170524
PL  - Uganda
TA  - Pan Afr Med J
JT  - The Pan African medical journal
JID - 101517926
SB  - IM
MH  - Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems/*standards
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
MH  - Health Personnel/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Zimbabwe/epidemiology
PMC - PMC5554661
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Adverse drug reactions
OT  - Kadoma
OT  - Zimbabwe
OT  - surveillance system
EDAT- 2017/08/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/11/04 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/16 [accepted]
AID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.55.11090 [doi]
AID - PAMJ-27-55 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Pan Afr Med J. 2017 May 24;27:55. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.55.11090.
      eCollection 2017.