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Prevalence and intensity of soil transmitted helminths among school children of Mendera Elementary School, Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia.

Abstract Soil transmitted helminths are wide spread in developing countries and in Ethiopia the prevalence of STHs varies in different parts of the country. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil transmitted helminths among school children of Mendera Elementary School Jimma town, Southwestern Ethiopia.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Hand Disinfection

Keywords

Ethiopia

Prevalence

intensity

school children

soil transmitted helminths

Journal Title the pan african medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28819509
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170818
DCOM- 20170904
LR  - 20170904
IS  - 1937-8688 (Electronic)
VI  - 27
DP  - 2017
TI  - Prevalence and intensity of soil transmitted helminths among school children of
      Mendera Elementary School, Jimma, Southwest Ethiopia.
PG  - 88
LID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.88.8817 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Soil transmitted helminths are wide spread in developing countries 
      and in Ethiopia the prevalence of STHs varies in different parts of the country. 
      The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil
      transmitted helminths among school children of Mendera Elementary School Jimma
      town, Southwestern Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted
      between March 29 and April 9, 2010 to determine the prevalence and intensity of
      soil transmitted helminths among elementary school children. The study
      participants were randomly selected from class enrollment list after proportional
      allocation of the total sample size to each grade. Data about the background
      characteristics were collected using structured questionnaire. The stool samples 
      were examined by McMaster method for the egg count which was used to determine
      intensity of infection. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows version 16 and 
      p-value less than 5% was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: Of the
      total 715 stool specimens examined, 346 were positive for at least one intestinal
      parasite making the prevalence 48.4%. The most prevalent parasites were Ascaris
      lumbricoides 169 (23.6%) and Trichuris trichiura 165 (23.1%). The prevalence of
      soil transmitted helminth in this study was 45.6% (326/715). There was
      statistically significant difference in the prevalence of Trichuriasis between
      those who use latrine always and who use sometimes (p = 0.010). Females are two
      times more likely to be positive for Ascaris than males (p = 0.039). Majority of 
      the students had light infection of soil transmitted helminths and none of them
      had heavy intensity of infection of Trichuriasis and hookworms. CONCLUSION:
      Nearly half of the school children were infected with at least one STHs and
      majority of the students had light infection of soil transmitted helminths.
      Students who did not wash their hands after defecation were three times more
      likely to be positive for Ascaris infection than those who washed their hands
      after defecation. Therefore, measures like health information dissemination on
      the advantage of washing hands after defecation and on proper use of latrine
      should be taken into account to alleviate the problem.
FAU - Tefera, Ephrem
AU  - Tefera E
AD  - Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health and Medical
      Sciences, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia.
FAU - Belay, Tariku
AU  - Belay T
AD  - Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical
      Sciences, Jimma University, P.O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
FAU - Mekonnen, Seleshi Kebede
AU  - Mekonnen SK
AD  - Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical
      Sciences, Jimma University, P.O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
FAU - Zeynudin, Ahmed
AU  - Zeynudin A
AD  - Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical
      Sciences, Jimma University, P.O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
FAU - Belachew, Tefera
AU  - Belachew T
AD  - Department of Population and Family Health, College of Public Health and Medical 
      Sciences, Jimma University, P.O. Box 378, Jimma, Ethiopia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170606
PL  - Uganda
TA  - Pan Afr Med J
JT  - The Pan African medical journal
JID - 101517926
RN  - 0 (Soil)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Animals
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Ethiopia/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - *Hand Disinfection
MH  - Helminthiasis/*epidemiology/parasitology
MH  - Helminths/*isolation & purification
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Sex Distribution
MH  - Soil/*parasitology
MH  - Students
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5554658
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Ethiopia
OT  - Prevalence
OT  - intensity
OT  - school children
OT  - soil transmitted helminths
EDAT- 2017/08/19 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/19 06:00
PHST- 2016/01/08 [received]
PHST- 2017/02/13 [accepted]
AID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.88.8817 [doi]
AID - PAMJ-27-88 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Pan Afr Med J. 2017 Jun 6;27:88. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2017.27.88.8817. eCollection 
      2017.