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Hygienic Behaviors and Risks for Ascariasis among College Students in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Abstract Teenagers have a high prevalence of ascariasis in low-income countries with endemic disease, and their hygienic behaviors and access to proper sanitation may be limited in rapidly urbanizing settings. We studied university students in Kabul to estimate the proportion with ascariasis and determine the prevalence of risk factors for infection. Ascariasis was assessed through microscopy for 520 students attending Kabul Medical University. Overall, 15.8% of students were infected. Living in a hostel (21.2% versus 10.4% in houses) using well water (27.7% versus 9.7% for piped water), eating street food (29.4% versus 3.0% for those who do not), and eating unwashed vegetables (63.6% versus 8.8% for those who do not) were risk factors for infection. Recent city migrants who live in group hostels, including students, are important targets for interventions to reduce ascariasis. Such interventions could include encouraging individuals to prepare their own food and use only potable water.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the american journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28829737
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170822
LR  - 20170822
IS  - 1476-1645 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-9637 (Linking)
VI  - 97
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Hygienic Behaviors and Risks for Ascariasis among College Students in Kabul,
      Afghanistan.
PG  - 563-566
LID - 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0968 [doi]
AB  - Teenagers have a high prevalence of ascariasis in low-income countries with
      endemic disease, and their hygienic behaviors and access to proper sanitation may
      be limited in rapidly urbanizing settings. We studied university students in
      Kabul to estimate the proportion with ascariasis and determine the prevalence of 
      risk factors for infection. Ascariasis was assessed through microscopy for 520
      students attending Kabul Medical University. Overall, 15.8% of students were
      infected. Living in a hostel (21.2% versus 10.4% in houses) using well water
      (27.7% versus 9.7% for piped water), eating street food (29.4% versus 3.0% for
      those who do not), and eating unwashed vegetables (63.6% versus 8.8% for those
      who do not) were risk factors for infection. Recent city migrants who live in
      group hostels, including students, are important targets for interventions to
      reduce ascariasis. Such interventions could include encouraging individuals to
      prepare their own food and use only potable water.
FAU - Mubarak, Mohammad Yousuf
AU  - Mubarak MY
AD  - Department of Microbiology, Kabul Medical University, Kabul, Afghanistan.
FAU - Wagner, Abram L
AU  - Wagner AL
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
FAU - Carlson, Bradley F
AU  - Carlson BF
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
FAU - Boulton, Matthew L
AU  - Boulton ML
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Trop Med Hyg
JT  - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
JID - 0370507
EDAT- 2017/08/23 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/23 06:00
AID - 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0968 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2017 Aug;97(2):563-566. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0968.