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Predictors of Sensitivity to Perceptual Learning in Children With Infantile Nystagmus.

Abstract To identify predictors of sensitivity to perceptual learning on a computerized, near-threshold letter discrimination task in children with infantile nystagmus (idiopathic IN: n = 18; oculocutaneous albinism accompanied by IN: n = 18).
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title investigative ophthalmology & visual science
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28829849
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170822
DCOM- 20170828
LR  - 20170828
IS  - 1552-5783 (Electronic)
IS  - 0146-0404 (Linking)
VI  - 58
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Aug 01
TI  - Predictors of Sensitivity to Perceptual Learning in Children With Infantile
      Nystagmus.
PG  - 4162-4172
LID - 10.1167/iovs.17-21913 [doi]
AB  - Purpose: To identify predictors of sensitivity to perceptual learning on a
      computerized, near-threshold letter discrimination task in children with
      infantile nystagmus (idiopathic IN: n = 18; oculocutaneous albinism accompanied
      by IN: n = 18). Methods: Children were divided into two age-, acuity-, and
      diagnosis-matched training groups: a crowded (n = 18) and an uncrowded training
      group (n = 18). Training consisted of 10 sessions spread out over 5 weeks (grand 
      total of 3500 trials). Baseline performance, age, diagnosis, training condition, 
      and perceived pleasantness of training (training joy) were entered as linear
      regression predictors of training-induced changes on a single- and a
      crowded-letter task. Results: An impressive 57% of the variability in
      improvements of single-letter visual acuity was explained by age, training
      condition, and training joy. Being older and training with uncrowded letters were
      associated with larger single-letter visual acuity improvements. More training
      joy was associated with a larger gain from the uncrowded training and a smaller
      gain from the crowded training. Fifty-six percent of the variability in
      crowded-letter task improvements was explained by baseline performance, age,
      diagnosis, and training condition. After regressing out the variability induced
      by training condition, baseline performance, and age, perceptual learning proved 
      more effective for children with idiopathic IN than for children with albinism
      accompanied by IN. Training gains increased with poorer baseline performance in
      idiopaths, but not in children with albinism accompanied by IN. Conclusions: Age 
      and baseline performance, but not training joy, are important prognostic factors 
      for the effect of perceptual learning in children with IN. However, their
      predictive value for achieving improvements in single-letter acuity and crowded
      letter acuity, respectively, differs between diagnostic subgroups and training
      condition. These findings may help with personalized treatment of individuals
      likely to benefit from perceptual learning.
FAU - Huurneman, Bianca
AU  - Huurneman B
AD  - Radboud University Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
      Behaviour, Cognitive Neuroscience Department, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD  - Bartimeus, Institute for the Visually Impaired, Zeist, The Netherlands.
FAU - Boonstra, F Nienke
AU  - Boonstra FN
AD  - Radboud University Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
      Behaviour, Cognitive Neuroscience Department, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
AD  - Bartimeus, Institute for the Visually Impaired, Zeist, The Netherlands.
FAU - Goossens, Jeroen
AU  - Goossens J
AD  - Radboud University Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and
      Behaviour, Cognitive Neuroscience Department, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci
JT  - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
JID - 7703701
SB  - IM
MH  - Albinism, Oculocutaneous/physiopathology
MH  - Child
MH  - Discrimination Learning/physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Learning/*physiology
MH  - Male
MH  - Nystagmus, Congenital/*physiopathology/rehabilitation
MH  - Pattern Recognition, Visual/*physiology
MH  - Regression Analysis
MH  - Sensory Thresholds/physiology
MH  - Visual Acuity
EDAT- 2017/08/23 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/23 06:00
AID - 2650861 [pii]
AID - 10.1167/iovs.17-21913 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2017 Aug 1;58(10):4162-4172. doi:
      10.1167/iovs.17-21913.