PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Risk Associated With Low-Level Exposure to Crystalline Silica: A 44-Year Cohort Study From China.

Abstract The association between low-level crystalline silica (silica) exposure and mortality risk is not well understood. We investigated a cohort of 44,807 Chinese workers who had worked in metal mines or pottery factories for at least 1 year from January 1, 1960, to December 31, 1974, and were followed through 2003. Low-level silica exposure was defined as having a lifetime highest annual mean silica exposure at or under a permissible exposure limit (PEL). We considered 3 widely used PELs, including 0.05 mg/m3, 0.10 mg/m3, and 0.35 mg/m3. Cumulative silica exposure was estimated by linking a job exposure matrix with each participant's work history. For the 0.10-mg/m3 exposure level, Cox proportional hazards models showed significantly increased risk of mortality from all diseases (for each 1-ln mg/m3-years increase in logged cumulative silica exposure, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.07), malignant neoplasms (HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.09), lung cancer (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.14), ischemic heart disease (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.16), pulmonary heart disease (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.16), and respiratory disease (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.26). The 0.05-mg/m3 and 0.35-mg/m3 exposure levels yielded similar associations. Long-term exposure to low levels (PELs ≤0.05 mg/m3, ≤0.10 mg/m3, or ≤0.35 mg/m3) of silica is associated with increased total and certain cause-specific mortality risk. Control of ambient silica levels and use of personal protective equipment should be emphasized in practice.
PMID
Related Publications

Exposure to crystalline silica, silicosis, and lung disease other than cancer in diatomaceous earth industry workers: a quantitative risk assessment.

Estimating historical exposure to silica among mine and pottery workers in the People's Republic of China.

Extended follow-up of lung cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease mortality among California diatomaceous earth workers.

Long-term exposure to crystalline silica and risk of heart disease mortality.

Long-term exposure to silica dust and risk of total and cause-specific mortality in Chinese workers: a cohort study.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

cohort studies

mortality

occupational exposure

permissible exposure limit

silica

Journal Title american journal of epidemiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28830080
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170823
DCOM- 20170901
LR  - 20170901
IS  - 1476-6256 (Electronic)
IS  - 0002-9262 (Linking)
VI  - 186
IP  - 4
DP  - 2017 Aug 15
TI  - Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Risk Associated With Low-Level Exposure to
      Crystalline Silica: A 44-Year Cohort Study From China.
PG  - 481-490
LID - 10.1093/aje/kwx124 [doi]
AB  - The association between low-level crystalline silica (silica) exposure and
      mortality risk is not well understood. We investigated a cohort of 44,807 Chinese
      workers who had worked in metal mines or pottery factories for at least 1 year
      from January 1, 1960, to December 31, 1974, and were followed through 2003.
      Low-level silica exposure was defined as having a lifetime highest annual mean
      silica exposure at or under a permissible exposure limit (PEL). We considered 3
      widely used PELs, including 0.05 mg/m3, 0.10 mg/m3, and 0.35 mg/m3. Cumulative
      silica exposure was estimated by linking a job exposure matrix with each
      participant's work history. For the 0.10-mg/m3 exposure level, Cox proportional
      hazards models showed significantly increased risk of mortality from all diseases
      (for each 1-ln mg/m3-years increase in logged cumulative silica exposure, hazard 
      ratio (HR) = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.07), malignant neoplasms
      (HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.09), lung cancer (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.14),
      ischemic heart disease (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.16), pulmonary heart disease
      (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.16), and respiratory disease (HR = 1.20, 95% CI:
      1.14, 1.26). The 0.05-mg/m3 and 0.35-mg/m3 exposure levels yielded similar
      associations. Long-term exposure to low levels (PELs </=0.05 mg/m3, </=0.10
      mg/m3, or </=0.35 mg/m3) of silica is associated with increased total and certain
      cause-specific mortality risk. Control of ambient silica levels and use of
      personal protective equipment should be emphasized in practice.
CI  - (c) The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the
      Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For
      permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]
FAU - Liu, Yuewei
AU  - Liu Y
FAU - Zhou, Yun
AU  - Zhou Y
FAU - Hnizdo, Eva
AU  - Hnizdo E
FAU - Shi, Tingming
AU  - Shi T
FAU - Steenland, Kyle
AU  - Steenland K
FAU - He, Xinjian
AU  - He X
FAU - Chen, Weihong
AU  - Chen W
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Am J Epidemiol
JT  - American journal of epidemiology
JID - 7910653
RN  - 7631-86-9 (Silicon Dioxide)
SB  - IM
MH  - Agriculture/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Cause of Death
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Heart Diseases/*chemically induced/mortality
MH  - Humans
MH  - Longitudinal Studies
MH  - Male
MH  - Manufacturing Industry/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Mining/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Neoplasms/*chemically induced/mortality
MH  - Occupational Diseases/*chemically induced/mortality
MH  - Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - Respiration Disorders/*chemically induced/mortality
MH  - Silicon Dioxide/*adverse effects
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - cohort studies
OT  - mortality
OT  - occupational exposure
OT  - permissible exposure limit
OT  - silica
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/05 [received]
PHST- 2016/09/29 [accepted]
AID - 3933093 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/aje/kwx124 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Aug 15;186(4):481-490. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwx124.