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Processed red meat contribution to dietary patterns and the associated cardio-metabolic outcomes.

Abstract Evidence suggests that processed red meat consumption is a risk factor for CVD and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This analysis investigates the association between dietary patterns, their processed red meat contributions, and association with blood biomarkers of CVD and T2D, in 786 Irish adults (18-90 years) using cross-sectional data from a 2011 national food consumption survey. All meat-containing foods consumed were assigned to four food groups (n 502) on the basis of whether they contained red or white meat and whether they were processed or unprocessed. The remaining foods (n 2050) were assigned to twenty-nine food groups. Two-step and k-means cluster analyses were applied to derive dietary patterns. Nutrient intakes, plasma fatty acids and biomarkers of CVD and T2D were assessed. A total of four dietary patterns were derived. In comparison with the pattern with lower contributions from processed red meat, the dietary pattern with greater processed red meat intakes presented a poorer Alternate Healthy Eating Index (21·2 (sd 7·7)), a greater proportion of smokers (29 %) and lower plasma EPA (1·34 (sd 0·72) %) and DHA (2·21 (sd 0·84) %) levels (P<0·001). There were no differences in classical biomarkers of CVD and T2D, including serum cholesterol and insulin, across dietary patterns. This suggests that the consideration of processed red meat consumption as a risk factor for CVD and T2D may need to be re-assessed.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Diet

Food Handling

Keywords

%TE percentage of total energy

T2D type 2 diabetes

CVD

Dietary pattern analysis

Processed red meat

Type 2 diabetes

Journal Title the british journal of nutrition
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28831958
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170823
DCOM- 20170907
LR  - 20170907
IS  - 1475-2662 (Electronic)
IS  - 0007-1145 (Linking)
VI  - 118
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Processed red meat contribution to dietary patterns and the associated
      cardio-metabolic outcomes.
PG  - 222-228
LID - 10.1017/S0007114517002008 [doi]
AB  - Evidence suggests that processed red meat consumption is a risk factor for CVD
      and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This analysis investigates the association between
      dietary patterns, their processed red meat contributions, and association with
      blood biomarkers of CVD and T2D, in 786 Irish adults (18-90 years) using
      cross-sectional data from a 2011 national food consumption survey. All
      meat-containing foods consumed were assigned to four food groups (n 502) on the
      basis of whether they contained red or white meat and whether they were processed
      or unprocessed. The remaining foods (n 2050) were assigned to twenty-nine food
      groups. Two-step and k-means cluster analyses were applied to derive dietary
      patterns. Nutrient intakes, plasma fatty acids and biomarkers of CVD and T2D were
      assessed. A total of four dietary patterns were derived. In comparison with the
      pattern with lower contributions from processed red meat, the dietary pattern
      with greater processed red meat intakes presented a poorer Alternate Healthy
      Eating Index (21.2 (sd 7.7)), a greater proportion of smokers (29 %) and lower
      plasma EPA (1.34 (sd 0.72) %) and DHA (2.21 (sd 0.84) %) levels (P&lt;0.001). There 
      were no differences in classical biomarkers of CVD and T2D, including serum
      cholesterol and insulin, across dietary patterns. This suggests that the
      consideration of processed red meat consumption as a risk factor for CVD and T2D 
      may need to be re-assessed.
FAU - Lenighan, Yvonne M
AU  - Lenighan YM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9179-6072
AD  - 1Nutrigenomics Research Group,School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports
      Science,UCD Conway Institute,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic
      of Ireland.
FAU - Nugent, Anne P
AU  - Nugent AP
AD  - 2School of Agriculture and Food Science,UCD Institute of Food and
      Health,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic of Ireland.
FAU - Li, Kaifeng F
AU  - Li KF
AD  - 2School of Agriculture and Food Science,UCD Institute of Food and
      Health,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic of Ireland.
FAU - Brennan, Lorraine
AU  - Brennan L
AD  - 2School of Agriculture and Food Science,UCD Institute of Food and
      Health,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic of Ireland.
FAU - Walton, Janette
AU  - Walton J
AD  - 3School of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University College Cork,Cork,Republic of
      Ireland.
FAU - Flynn, Albert
AU  - Flynn A
AD  - 3School of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University College Cork,Cork,Republic of
      Ireland.
FAU - Roche, Helen M
AU  - Roche HM
AD  - 1Nutrigenomics Research Group,School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports
      Science,UCD Conway Institute,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic
      of Ireland.
FAU - McNulty, Breige A
AU  - McNulty BA
AD  - 2School of Agriculture and Food Science,UCD Institute of Food and
      Health,University College Dublin,Belfield,Dublin 4,Republic of Ireland.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - Br J Nutr
JT  - The British journal of nutrition
JID - 0372547
RN  - 0 (Biomarkers)
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Cholesterol, HDL)
RN  - 0 (Cholesterol, LDL)
RN  - 0 (Fatty Acids)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (Triglycerides)
RN  - 25167-62-8 (Docosahexaenoic Acids)
RN  - AAN7QOV9EA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Biomarkers/blood
MH  - Blood Glucose/metabolism
MH  - Cardiovascular Diseases/blood/*epidemiology
MH  - Cholesterol, HDL/blood
MH  - Cholesterol, LDL/blood
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/*epidemiology
MH  - *Diet
MH  - Docosahexaenoic Acids/blood
MH  - Eicosapentaenoic Acid/blood
MH  - Fatty Acids/blood
MH  - Female
MH  - *Food Handling
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insulin/blood
MH  - Male
MH  - Metabolic Syndrome X/blood/*epidemiology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Nutrition Assessment
MH  - Nutrition Surveys
MH  - Red Meat/*adverse effects
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Socioeconomic Factors
MH  - Triglycerides/blood
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - %TE percentage of total energy
OT  - T2D type 2 diabetes
OT  - CVD
OT  - Dietary pattern analysis
OT  - Processed red meat
OT  - Type 2 diabetes
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
AID - S0007114517002008 [pii]
AID - 10.1017/S0007114517002008 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Br J Nutr. 2017 Aug;118(3):222-228. doi: 10.1017/S0007114517002008.