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Committee Opinion No. 716 Summary: The Role of the Obstetrician-Gynecologist in the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Women at Average Risk.

Abstract Ovarian cancer is the second most common type of female reproductive cancer, and more women die from ovarian cancer than from cervical cancer and uterine cancer combined. Currently, there is no strategy for early detection of ovarian cancer that reduces ovarian cancer mortality. Taking a detailed personal and family history for breast, gynecologic, and colon cancer facilitates categorizing women based on their risk (average risk or high risk) of developing epithelial ovarian cancer. Women with a strong family history of ovarian, breast, or colon cancer may have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (BRCA mutation) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome), and these women are at increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Women with these conditions should be referred for formal genetic counseling to better assess their cancer risk, including their risk of ovarian cancer. If appropriate, these women may be offered additional testing for early detection of ovarian cancer. The use of transvaginal ultrasonography and tumor markers (such as cancer antigen 125), alone or in combination, for the early detection of ovarian cancer in average-risk women have not been proved to reduce mortality, and harms exist from invasive diagnostic testing (eg, surgery) resulting from false-positive test results. The patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist should maintain an appropriate level of suspicion when potentially relevant signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer are present.
PMID
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Committee Opinion No. 716: The Role of the Obstetrician-Gynecologist in the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Women at Average Risk.

Authors
Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title obstetrics and gynecology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28832478
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170823
DCOM- 20170908
LR  - 20170908
IS  - 1873-233X (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-7844 (Linking)
VI  - 130
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Committee Opinion No. 716 Summary: The Role of the Obstetrician-Gynecologist in
      the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Women at Average Risk.
PG  - 664-665
LID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002289 [doi]
AB  - Ovarian cancer is the second most common type of female reproductive cancer, and 
      more women die from ovarian cancer than from cervical cancer and uterine cancer
      combined. Currently, there is no strategy for early detection of ovarian cancer
      that reduces ovarian cancer mortality. Taking a detailed personal and family
      history for breast, gynecologic, and colon cancer facilitates categorizing women 
      based on their risk (average risk or high risk) of developing epithelial ovarian 
      cancer. Women with a strong family history of ovarian, breast, or colon cancer
      may have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (BRCA mutation) or
      hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome), and these women are
      at increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Women with these conditions
      should be referred for formal genetic counseling to better assess their cancer
      risk, including their risk of ovarian cancer. If appropriate, these women may be 
      offered additional testing for early detection of ovarian cancer. The use of
      transvaginal ultrasonography and tumor markers (such as cancer antigen 125),
      alone or in combination, for the early detection of ovarian cancer in
      average-risk women have not been proved to reduce mortality, and harms exist from
      invasive diagnostic testing (eg, surgery) resulting from false-positive test
      results. The patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist should maintain an
      appropriate level of suspicion when potentially relevant signs and symptoms of
      ovarian cancer are present.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Practice Guideline
PL  - United States
TA  - Obstet Gynecol
JT  - Obstetrics and gynecology
JID - 0401101
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Early Detection of Cancer
MH  - Female
MH  - Gynecology/*standards
MH  - Humans
MH  - Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial/*diagnosis
MH  - Obstetrics/*standards
MH  - Ovarian Neoplasms/*diagnosis
MH  - Practice Patterns, Physicians'/*standards
MH  - Societies, Medical
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
AID - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002289 [doi]
AID - 00006250-201709000-00038 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Sep;130(3):664-665. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002289.