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Associations between body mass index and the risk of mortality from lung cancer: A dose-response PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Abstract Whether body mass index (BMI) is associated with the risk of mortality from lung cancer (LC) is controversial, and the shape of dose-response relationship on this topic is not well-established. Thus, a dose-response meta-analysis was performed to clarify this association.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28834876
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170823
LR  - 20170823
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 34
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Associations between body mass index and the risk of mortality from lung cancer: 
      A dose-response PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
PG  - e7721
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007721 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Whether body mass index (BMI) is associated with the risk of
      mortality from lung cancer (LC) is controversial, and the shape of dose-response 
      relationship on this topic is not well-established. Thus, a dose-response
      meta-analysis was performed to clarify this association. METHODS: A search of
      PubMed and EMBASE was conducted, and 2-stage random-effect dose-response model
      was used to yield summary relative risks and its shape. RESULTS: Fifteen
      prospective cohort studies were eligible for inclusion criteria. The combined
      relative risks per 5 kg/m in BMI for risk of LC mortality is 0.94 (95% confidence
      interval] 0.92-0.96), and nonlinear association was found (Pnonlinearity <
      .0001), which indicated that compared with higher BMI, lower BMI showed higher LC
      mortality risk. Subgroup analyses revealed that this obesity paradox remained
      regardless of number of cases, follow-up duration, and study location, but this
      relationship was not observed among nonsmokers. CONCLUSION: A nonlinear
      association between BMI and the risk of LC mortality was found, and higher BMI
      participants have a lower risk of LC death than slim people.
FAU - Shen, Ning
AU  - Shen N
AD  - aDepartment of Oncology, Jinan Military General Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, China 
      bDepartment of Oncology, Zhangqiu People's Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, China
      cDepartment of Internal Medicine, Zhangqiu People's Hospital, Jinan, Shandong,
      China.
FAU - Fu, Ping
AU  - Fu P
FAU - Cui, Bin
AU  - Cui B
FAU - Bu, Chun-Ying
AU  - Bu CY
FAU - Bi, Jing-Wang
AU  - Bi JW
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007721 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201708250-00013 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Aug;96(34):e7721. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000007721.