PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Factors predicting dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery: A multicenter retrospective study for 2 years of follow-up.

Abstract A multicenter retrospective study.The purpose of this study was to explore risk factors of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery and factors affecting rehabilitation of dysphagia 2 years after surgery.Patients who underwent anterior cervical surgery at 3 centers from January 2010 to January 2013 were included. The possible factors included 3 aspects: demographic variables-age, sex, body mass index (BMI): hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, alcohol use, diagnose (cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament), preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), surgical-related variables-surgical option (ACDF, ACCF, ACCDF, or Zero profile), operation time, blood loss, operative level, superior fusion segment, incision length, angle of C2 to C7, height of C2 to C7, cervical circumference, cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7.The results of our study indicated that the rate of dysphagia at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 20%, 5.4%, 2.4%, 1.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Our results showed that age (58.8 years old), BMI (27.3 kg/m), course of disease (11.6 months), operation time (103.2 min), blood loss (151.6 mL), incision length (9.1 cm), cervical circumference (46.8 cm), angle of C2 to C7 (15.3°), cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7 (4.8), preoperative VAS (7.5), and ODI (0.6) in dysphagia group were significantly higher than those (52.0, 24.6, 8.6, 88.2, 121.6, 8.6, 42.3, 12.6, 3.7, 5.6, and 0.4, respectively) in nondysphagia group; however, height of C2 to C7 (9.9 vs 11.7 cm) and preoperative JOA (8.3 vs 10.7) had opposite trend between 2 groups. We could also infer that female, smoking, diabetes, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, ACCDF, multilevel surgery, and superior fusion segment including C2 to C3 or C6 to C7 were the risk factors for dysphagia after surgery immediately. However, till 2 years after surgery, only 2 risk factors, smoking and diabetes, could slow rehabilitation of dysphagia.Many factors could significantly increase rate of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery. Operation time as a vital factor markedly increases immediate postoperative dysphagia and smoking, as the most important factor, lower recovery of dysphagia. Further study is needed to prove if these factors could influence dysphagia.
PMID
Related Publications

Surgically treated cervical myelopathy: a functional outcome comparison study between multilevel anterior cervical decompression fusion with instrumentation and posterior laminoplasty.

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion in multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy: A meta-analysis.

The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

The impact of dynamic factors on surgical outcomes after double-door laminoplasty for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine.

The Role of C2-C7 Angle in the Development of Dysphagia After Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28834916
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170823
LR  - 20170823
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 34
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Factors predicting dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery: A multicenter
      retrospective study for 2 years of follow-up.
PG  - e7916
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007916 [doi]
AB  - A multicenter retrospective study.The purpose of this study was to explore risk
      factors of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery and factors affecting
      rehabilitation of dysphagia 2 years after surgery.Patients who underwent anterior
      cervical surgery at 3 centers from January 2010 to January 2013 were included.
      The possible factors included 3 aspects: demographic variables-age, sex, body
      mass index (BMI): hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, alcohol use,
      diagnose (cervical spondylotic myelopathy or ossification of posterior
      longitudinal ligament), preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry
      Disability Index (ODI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), surgical-related 
      variables-surgical option (ACDF, ACCF, ACCDF, or Zero profile), operation time,
      blood loss, operative level, superior fusion segment, incision length, angle of
      C2 to C7, height of C2 to C7, cervical circumference, cervical
      circumference/height of C2 to C7.The results of our study indicated that the rate
      of dysphagia at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery was 20%, 5.4%, 2.4%,
      1.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Our results showed that age (58.8 years old), BMI
      (27.3 kg/m), course of disease (11.6 months), operation time (103.2 min), blood
      loss (151.6 mL), incision length (9.1 cm), cervical circumference (46.8 cm),
      angle of C2 to C7 (15.3 degrees ), cervical circumference/height of C2 to C7
      (4.8), preoperative VAS (7.5), and ODI (0.6) in dysphagia group were
      significantly higher than those (52.0, 24.6, 8.6, 88.2, 121.6, 8.6, 42.3, 12.6,
      3.7, 5.6, and 0.4, respectively) in nondysphagia group; however, height of C2 to 
      C7 (9.9 vs 11.7 cm) and preoperative JOA (8.3 vs 10.7) had opposite trend between
      2 groups. We could also infer that female, smoking, diabetes, ossification of
      posterior longitudinal ligament, ACCDF, multilevel surgery, and superior fusion
      segment including C2 to C3 or C6 to C7 were the risk factors for dysphagia after 
      surgery immediately. However, till 2 years after surgery, only 2 risk factors,
      smoking and diabetes, could slow rehabilitation of dysphagia.Many factors could
      significantly increase rate of dysphagia after anterior cervical surgery.
      Operation time as a vital factor markedly increases immediate postoperative
      dysphagia and smoking, as the most important factor, lower recovery of dysphagia.
      Further study is needed to prove if these factors could influence dysphagia.
FAU - Wang, Tao
AU  - Wang T
AD  - aDepartment of Orthopaedics, The Ninth People Hospital of Wuxi, Wuxi bDepartment 
      of Orthopaedics, The First Hospital of HanDan, HanDan cDepartment of
      Orthopaedics, The First Hospital of Shijiazhuang, Shijiazhuang dDepartment of
      Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang,
      China.
FAU - Ma, Lei
AU  - Ma L
FAU - Yang, Da-Long
AU  - Yang DL
FAU - Wang, Hui
AU  - Wang H
FAU - Bai, Zhi-Long
AU  - Bai ZL
FAU - Zhang, Li-Jun
AU  - Zhang LJ
FAU - Ding, Wen-Yuan
AU  - Ding WY
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007916 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201708250-00053 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Aug;96(34):e7916. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000007916.