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CDC Grand Rounds: Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss and Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

Abstract Newborn screening is a public health program that benefits 4 million U.S. infants every year by enabling early detection of serious conditions, thus affording the opportunity for timely intervention to optimize outcomes (1). States and other U.S. jurisdictions decide whether and how to regulate newborn screening practices. Most newborn screening is done through laboratory analyses of dried bloodspot specimens collected from newborns. Point-of-care newborn screening is typically performed before discharge from the birthing facility. The Recommended Uniform Screening Panel includes two point-of-care conditions for newborn screening: hearing loss and critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). The objectives of point-of-care screening for these two conditions are early identification and intervention to improve neurodevelopment, most notably language and related skills among infants with permanent hearing loss, and to prevent death or severe disability resulting from delayed diagnosis of CCHD. Universal screening for hearing loss using otoacoustic emissions or automated auditory brainstem response was endorsed by the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing in 2000 and 2007* and was incorporated in the first Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2005. Screening for CCHD using pulse oximetry was recommended by the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children in 2010 based on an evidence review(†) and was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011.(§).
PMID
Related Publications

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State Legislation, Regulations, and Hospital Guidelines for Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects - United States, 2011-2014.

Newborn hearing screening: the great omission.

Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Point-of-Care Systems

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28837548
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170824
DCOM- 20170828
LR  - 20170828
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 33
DP  - 2017 Aug 25
TI  - CDC Grand Rounds: Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss and Critical Congenital
      Heart Disease.
PG  - 888-890
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6633a4 [doi]
AB  - Newborn screening is a public health program that benefits 4 million U.S. infants
      every year by enabling early detection of serious conditions, thus affording the 
      opportunity for timely intervention to optimize outcomes (1). States and other
      U.S. jurisdictions decide whether and how to regulate newborn screening
      practices. Most newborn screening is done through laboratory analyses of dried
      bloodspot specimens collected from newborns. Point-of-care newborn screening is
      typically performed before discharge from the birthing facility. The Recommended 
      Uniform Screening Panel includes two point-of-care conditions for newborn
      screening: hearing loss and critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). The
      objectives of point-of-care screening for these two conditions are early
      identification and intervention to improve neurodevelopment, most notably
      language and related skills among infants with permanent hearing loss, and to
      prevent death or severe disability resulting from delayed diagnosis of CCHD.
      Universal screening for hearing loss using otoacoustic emissions or automated
      auditory brainstem response was endorsed by the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing
      in 2000 and 2007* and was incorporated in the first Recommended Uniform Screening
      Panel in 2005. Screening for CCHD using pulse oximetry was recommended by the
      Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children in 2010 based 
      on an evidence reviewdagger and was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening
      Panel in 2011. section sign.
FAU - Grosse, Scott D
AU  - Grosse SD
FAU - Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany
AU  - Riehle-Colarusso T
FAU - Gaffney, Marcus
AU  - Gaffney M
FAU - Mason, Craig A
AU  - Mason CA
FAU - Shapira, Stuart K
AU  - Shapira SK
FAU - Sontag, Marci K
AU  - Sontag MK
FAU - Braun, Kim Van Naarden
AU  - Braun KVN
FAU - Iskander, John
AU  - Iskander J
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170825
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - Early Diagnosis
MH  - Hearing Loss/*diagnosis
MH  - Heart Defects, Congenital/*diagnosis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Neonatal Screening/*methods
MH  - *Point-of-Care Systems
MH  - Program Evaluation
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2017/08/25 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/29 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/25 06:00
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6633a4 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Aug 25;66(33):888-890. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6633a4.