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Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Persistence Following Systemic Chemotherapy for Malignancy.

Abstract Systemic chemotherapies for various malignancies have been shown to significantly, yet transiently, decrease numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes, a major reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, little is known about the impact of cytoreductive chemotherapy on HIV-1 reservoir dynamics, persistence, and immune responses.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active

Keywords

HIV-1

chemotherapy

cytomegalovirus infection

lymphoma

stem cell transplantation

Journal Title the journal of infectious diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28838149
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170825
DCOM- 20170907
LR  - 20170907
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 216
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jul 15
TI  - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Persistence Following Systemic Chemotherapy
      for Malignancy.
PG  - 254-262
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jix265 [doi]
AB  - Background: Systemic chemotherapies for various malignancies have been shown to
      significantly, yet transiently, decrease numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes, a major
      reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However,
      little is known about the impact of cytoreductive chemotherapy on HIV-1 reservoir
      dynamics, persistence, and immune responses. Methods: We investigated the changes
      in peripheral CD4+ T-cell-associated HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels, lymphocyte
      activation, viral population structure, and virus-specific immune responses in a 
      longitudinal cohort of 15 HIV-1-infected individuals receiving systemic
      chemotherapy or subsequent autologous stem cell transplantation for treatment of 
      hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Results: Despite a transient
      reduction in CD4+ T cells capable of harboring HIV-1, a 1.7- and 3.3-fold
      increase in mean CD4+ T-cell-associated HIV-1 RNA and DNA, respectively, were
      observed months following completion of chemotherapy in individuals on
      antiretroviral therapy. We also observed changes in CD4+ T-cell population
      diversity and clonal viral sequence expansion during CD4+ T-cell reconstitution
      following chemotherapy cessation. Finally, HIV-1 DNA was preferentially, and in
      some cases exclusively, detected in cytomegalovirus (CMV)- and Epstein-Barr virus
      (EBV)-responsive CD4+ T cells following chemotherapy. Conclusions: Expansion of
      HIV-infected CMV/EBV-specific CD4 + T cells may contribute to maintenance of the 
      HIV DNA reservoir following chemotherapy.
FAU - Henrich, Timothy J
AU  - Henrich TJ
AD  - Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
FAU - Hobbs, Kristen S
AU  - Hobbs KS
AD  - Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
FAU - Hanhauser, Emily
AU  - Hanhauser E
AD  - Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
FAU - Scully, Eileen
AU  - Scully E
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.
FAU - Hogan, Louise E
AU  - Hogan LE
AD  - Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
FAU - Robles, Yvonne P
AU  - Robles YP
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
FAU - Leadabrand, Kaitlyn S
AU  - Leadabrand KS
AD  - Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.
FAU - Marty, Francisco M
AU  - Marty FM
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.
FAU - Palmer, Christine D
AU  - Palmer CD
AD  - Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of
      Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge.
FAU - Jost, Stephanie
AU  - Jost S
AD  - Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of
      Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge.
AD  - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
FAU - Korner, Christian
AU  - Korner C
AD  - Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of
      Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge.
FAU - Li, Jonathan Z
AU  - Li JZ
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
FAU - Gandhi, Rajesh T
AU  - Gandhi RT
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of
      Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge.
AD  - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
FAU - Hamdan, Ayad
AU  - Hamdan A
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
FAU - Abramson, Jeremy
AU  - Abramson J
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
FAU - LaCasce, Ann S
AU  - LaCasce AS
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
AD  - Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.
FAU - Kuritzkes, Daniel R
AU  - Kuritzkes DR
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital.
AD  - Harvard Medical School.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
RN  - 0 (DNA, Viral)
RN  - 0 (RNA, Viral)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - *Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
MH  - CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology
MH  - Cytomegalovirus
MH  - Cytomegalovirus Infections
MH  - DNA, Viral/analysis
MH  - Drug Therapy
MH  - Female
MH  - HIV Infections/*drug therapy
MH  - HIV-1
MH  - Herpesvirus 4, Human
MH  - Humans
MH  - Lymphocyte Activation
MH  - Male
MH  - Neoplasms/*complications/therapy/virology
MH  - Prospective Studies
MH  - RNA, Viral/analysis
MH  - Stem Cell Transplantation
MH  - Viral Load
MH  - Virus Replication
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - HIV-1
OT  - chemotherapy
OT  - cytomegalovirus infection
OT  - lymphoma
OT  - stem cell transplantation
EDAT- 2017/08/26 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/26 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/06 [received]
PHST- 2017/05/30 [accepted]
AID - 3860643 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jix265 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 15;216(2):254-262. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix265.