PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.




PMID- 28838150
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170825
DCOM- 20170907
LR  - 20170907
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 216
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jul 15
TI  - Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Infections Clear More Slowly in Men Than Women, but
      Are Less Likely to Become Established.
PG  - 237-244
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jix283 [doi]
AB  - Background: Rigorous estimates for clearance rates of untreated chlamydia
      infections are important for understanding chlamydia epidemiology and designing
      control interventions, but were previously only available for women. Methods: We 
      used data from published studies of chlamydia-infected men who were retested at a
      later date without having received treatment. Our analysis allowed new infections
      to take one of 1, 2, or 3 courses, each clearing at a different rate. We
      determined which of these 3 models had the most empirical support. Results: The
      best-fitting model had 2 courses of infection in men, as was previously found for
      women: "slow-clearing" and "fast-clearing." Only 68% (57%-78%) (posterior median 
      and 95% credible interval [CrI]) of incident infections in men were
      slow-clearing, vs 77% (69%-84%) in women. The slow clearance rate in men (based
      on 6 months' follow-up) was 0.35 (.05-1.15) year-1 (posterior median and 95%
      CrI), corresponding to mean infection duration 2.84 (.87-18.79) years. This
      compares to 1.35 (1.13-1.63) years in women. Conclusions: Our estimated clearance
      rate is slower than previously assumed. Fewer infections become established in
      men than women but once established, they clear more slowly. This study provides 
      an improved description of chlamydia's natural history to inform public health
      decision making. We describe how further data collection could reduce uncertainty
      in estimates.
FAU - Lewis, Joanna
AU  - Lewis J
AD  - National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in 
      Modelling Methodology and Medical Research Council Centre for Outbreak Analysis
      and Modelling, Imperial College London School of Public Health.
AD  - Modelling and Economics Unit, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 
      London.
FAU - Price, Malcolm J
AU  - Price MJ
AD  - Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham.
FAU - Horner, Paddy J
AU  - Horner PJ
AD  - NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions, University
      of Bristol, United Kingdom.
FAU - White, Peter J
AU  - White PJ
AD  - National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in 
      Modelling Methodology and Medical Research Council Centre for Outbreak Analysis
      and Modelling, Imperial College London School of Public Health.
AD  - Modelling and Economics Unit, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 
      London.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Bayes Theorem
MH  - Chlamydia Infections/*epidemiology
MH  - Chlamydia trachomatis/*pathogenicity
MH  - *Disease Progression
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Models, Theoretical
MH  - *Sex Factors
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Bayesian inference
OT  - chlamydia
OT  - evidence synthesis
OT  - natural history
OT  - sexually transmitted diseases
EDAT- 2017/08/26 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/26 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/14 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/08 [accepted]
AID - 3867429 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jix283 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 15;216(2):237-244. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix283.