PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Lessons Learned and Legacy of the Stop Transmission of Polio Program.

Abstract In 1988, the by the World Health Assembly established the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, which consisted of a partnership among the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotary International, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United Nations Children's Fund. By 2016, the annual incidence of polio had decreased by >99.9%, compared with 1988, and at the time of writing, only 3 countries in which wild poliovirus circulation has never been interrupted remain: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. A key strategy for polio eradication has been the development of a skilled and deployable workforce to implement eradication activities across the globe. In 1999, the Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) program was developed and initiated by the CDC, in collaboration with the WHO, to train and mobilize additional human resources to provide technical assistance to polio-endemic countries. STOP has also informed the development of other public health workforce capacity to support polio eradication efforts, including national STOP programs. In addition, the program has diversified to address measles and rubella elimination, data management and quality, and strengthening routine immunization programs. This article describes the STOP program and how it has contributed to polio eradication by building global public health workforce capacity.
PMID
Related Publications

Transitioning Lessons Learned and Assets of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative to Global and Regional Measles and Rubella Elimination.

Contribution of Global Polio Eradication Initiative-Funded Personnel to the Strengthening of Routine Immunization Programs in the 10 Focus Countries of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan.

Polio Legacy in Action: Using the Polio Eradication Infrastructure for Measles Elimination in Nigeria-The National Stop Transmission of Polio Program.

Using the Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) Program to Develop a South Sudan Expanded Program on Immunization Workforce.

The global polio eradication initiative Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) program - 1999-2013.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords

capacity building

olio eradication

workforce development

Journal Title the journal of infectious diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28838200
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170825
DCOM- 20170905
LR  - 20170906
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 216
IP  - suppl_1
DP  - 2017 Jul 01
TI  - Lessons Learned and Legacy of the Stop Transmission of Polio Program.
PG  - S316-S323
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jix163 [doi]
AB  - In 1988, the by the World Health Assembly established the Global Polio
      Eradication Initiative, which consisted of a partnership among the World Health
      Organization (WHO), Rotary International, the Centers for Disease Control and
      Prevention (CDC), and the United Nations Children's Fund. By 2016, the annual
      incidence of polio had decreased by >99.9%, compared with 1988, and at the time
      of writing, only 3 countries in which wild poliovirus circulation has never been 
      interrupted remain: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. A key strategy for polio 
      eradication has been the development of a skilled and deployable workforce to
      implement eradication activities across the globe. In 1999, the Stop Transmission
      of Polio (STOP) program was developed and initiated by the CDC, in collaboration 
      with the WHO, to train and mobilize additional human resources to provide
      technical assistance to polio-endemic countries. STOP has also informed the
      development of other public health workforce capacity to support polio
      eradication efforts, including national STOP programs. In addition, the program
      has diversified to address measles and rubella elimination, data management and
      quality, and strengthening routine immunization programs. This article describes 
      the STOP program and how it has contributed to polio eradication by building
      global public health workforce capacity.
CI  - (c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious
      Diseases Society of America.
FAU - Kerr, Yinka
AU  - Kerr Y
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Mailhot, Melinda
AU  - Mailhot M
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Williams, Alford A J
AU  - Williams AAJ
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Swezy, Virginia
AU  - Swezy V
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Quick, Linda
AU  - Quick L
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Tangermann, Rudolf H
AU  - Tangermann RH
AD  - World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
FAU - Ward, Kirsten
AU  - Ward K
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Benke, Amalia
AU  - Benke A
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Callaghan, Anna
AU  - Callaghan A
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Clark, Kathleen
AU  - Clark K
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Emery, Brian
AU  - Emery B
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Nix, Jessica
AU  - Nix J
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Aydlotte, Eleanor
AU  - Aydlotte E
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Newman, Charlotte
AU  - Newman C
AD  - Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Nkowane, Benjamin
AU  - Nkowane B
AD  - World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Capacity Building
MH  - Disease Eradication/*organization & administration
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunization Programs/*organization & administration
MH  - Measles/prevention & control
MH  - Poliomyelitis/*prevention & control
MH  - Rubella/prevention & control
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - capacity building
OT  - olio eradication
OT  - workforce development
EDAT- 2017/08/26 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/26 06:00
AID - 3935078 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jix163 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 1;216(suppl_1):S316-S323. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix163.