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Nurses' Burnout: The Influence of Leader Empowering Behaviors, Work Conditions, and Demographic Traits.

Abstract Nurse burnout is a widespread phenomenon characterized by a reduction in nurses' energy that manifests in emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation, and feelings of frustration and may lead to reductions in work efficacy. This study was conducted to assess the level of burnout among Jordanian nurses and to investigate the influence of leader empowering behaviors (LEBs) on nurses' feelings of burnout in an endeavor to improve nursing work outcomes. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used. Leader Empowering Behaviors Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were employed to collect data from 407 registered nurses, recruited from 11 hospitals in Jordan. The Jordanian nurses exhibited high levels of burnout as demonstrated by their high scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE) and Depersonalization (DP) and moderate scores for Personal Accomplishment (PA). Factors related to work conditions, nurses' demographic traits, and LEBs were significantly correlated with the burnout categories. A stepwise regression model-exposed 4 factors predicted EE: hospital type, nurses' work shift, providing autonomy, and fostering participation in decision making. Gender, fostering participation in decision making, and department type were responsible for 5.9% of the DP variance, whereas facilitating goal attainment and nursing experience accounted for 8.3% of the PA variance. This study highlights the importance of the role of nurse leaders in improving work conditions and empowering and motivating nurses to decrease nurses' feelings of burnout, reduce turnover rates, and improve the quality of nursing care.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Demography

Power (Psychology)

Keywords

Jordan

burnout

cross-sectional study

decision making

demography

leader empowering behaviors

leadership

work conditions

Journal Title inquiry : a journal of medical care organization, provision and financing
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28844166
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170828
DCOM- 20170911
LR  - 20170911
IS  - 1945-7243 (Electronic)
IS  - 0046-9580 (Linking)
VI  - 54
DP  - 2017 Jan 01
TI  - Nurses' Burnout: The Influence of Leader Empowering Behaviors, Work Conditions,
      and Demographic Traits.
PG  - 46958017724944
LID - 10.1177/0046958017724944 [doi]
AB  - Nurse burnout is a widespread phenomenon characterized by a reduction in nurses' 
      energy that manifests in emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation, and feelings
      of frustration and may lead to reductions in work efficacy. This study was
      conducted to assess the level of burnout among Jordanian nurses and to
      investigate the influence of leader empowering behaviors (LEBs) on nurses'
      feelings of burnout in an endeavor to improve nursing work outcomes. A
      cross-sectional and correlational design was used. Leader Empowering Behaviors
      Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were employed to collect data from 
      407 registered nurses, recruited from 11 hospitals in Jordan. The Jordanian
      nurses exhibited high levels of burnout as demonstrated by their high scores for 
      Emotional Exhaustion (EE) and Depersonalization (DP) and moderate scores for
      Personal Accomplishment (PA). Factors related to work conditions, nurses'
      demographic traits, and LEBs were significantly correlated with the burnout
      categories. A stepwise regression model-exposed 4 factors predicted EE: hospital 
      type, nurses' work shift, providing autonomy, and fostering participation in
      decision making. Gender, fostering participation in decision making, and
      department type were responsible for 5.9% of the DP variance, whereas
      facilitating goal attainment and nursing experience accounted for 8.3% of the PA 
      variance. This study highlights the importance of the role of nurse leaders in
      improving work conditions and empowering and motivating nurses to decrease
      nurses' feelings of burnout, reduce turnover rates, and improve the quality of
      nursing care.
FAU - Mudallal, Rola H
AU  - Mudallal RH
AD  - 1 The Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
FAU - Othman, Wafa'a M
AU  - Othman WM
AD  - 1 The Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan.
FAU - Al Hassan, Nahid F
AU  - Al Hassan NF
AD  - 2 Armed Forces Hospital Southern Region, Khamis Mushait, Saudi Arabia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Inquiry
JT  - Inquiry : a journal of medical care organization, provision and financing
JID - 0171671
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Burnout, Professional/*psychology
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Decision Making
MH  - *Demography
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Jordan
MH  - Male
MH  - Motivation
MH  - Nursing Staff, Hospital/*psychology
MH  - *Power (Psychology)
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Workplace/*psychology
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Jordan
OT  - burnout
OT  - cross-sectional study
OT  - decision making
OT  - demography
OT  - leader empowering behaviors
OT  - leadership
OT  - work conditions
EDAT- 2017/08/29 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/29 06:00
AID - 10.1177/0046958017724944 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Inquiry. 2017 Jan 1;54:46958017724944. doi: 10.1177/0046958017724944.