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Comparative analysis of diagnostic colonoscopy in symptomatic young adults from South Korea and the United States.

Abstract To date, not much is known about ethnic differences in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic young patients with lower gastrointestinal symptoms. This study sought to compare diagnostic colonoscopic findings in symptomatic young patients from South Korea and the United States. Results from the first diagnostic colonoscopies in symptomatic 18- to 49-year-old patients were compared between the United States and Korean cohorts. The US cohort data were collected at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington between January 2007 and January 2010, and the Korean cohort data were collected at 14 university hospitals in Korea between June 2006 and June 2015.The prevalence of advanced neoplasias was similar in both cohorts for bleeding and nonbleeding symptoms (P = .966 and P = .076, respectively). In a subgroup analysis for 40- to 49-year-old patients, the prevalence of advanced neoplasias was similar for bleeding symptoms; however, nonbleeding symptoms were significantly higher in the Korean cohort than in the US cohort (6.2% vs 2.6%, P < .001). In an age subgroup analysis for 18- to 39-year-old patients, the prevalence of advanced neoplasias was similar for bleeding and nonbleeding symptoms in both cohorts. Multivariate analysis showed that lower gastrointestinal symptoms were not associated with the risk of any type of advanced neoplasia in young Korean patients.Ethnic disparities in the prevalence of advanced neoplasia on diagnostic colonoscopy were not noticeable between Korean and US young patients. However, 40- to 49-year-old patients with nonbleeding symptoms require more attention to detect advanced neoplasia in Korea than similarly aged patients in the United States.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28858078
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170831
DCOM- 20170911
LR  - 20170912
IS  - 1536-5964 (Electronic)
IS  - 0025-7974 (Linking)
VI  - 96
IP  - 35
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Comparative analysis of diagnostic colonoscopy in symptomatic young adults from
      South Korea and the United States.
PG  - e7504
LID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007504 [doi]
AB  - To date, not much is known about ethnic differences in the prevalence of
      colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic young patients with lower gastrointestinal
      symptoms. This study sought to compare diagnostic colonoscopic findings in
      symptomatic young patients from South Korea and the United States. Results from
      the first diagnostic colonoscopies in symptomatic 18- to 49-year-old patients
      were compared between the United States and Korean cohorts. The US cohort data
      were collected at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington between
      January 2007 and January 2010, and the Korean cohort data were collected at 14
      university hospitals in Korea between June 2006 and June 2015.The prevalence of
      advanced neoplasias was similar in both cohorts for bleeding and nonbleeding
      symptoms (P = .966 and P = .076, respectively). In a subgroup analysis for 40- to
      49-year-old patients, the prevalence of advanced neoplasias was similar for
      bleeding symptoms; however, nonbleeding symptoms were significantly higher in the
      Korean cohort than in the US cohort (6.2% vs 2.6%, P &lt; .001). In an age subgroup 
      analysis for 18- to 39-year-old patients, the prevalence of advanced neoplasias
      was similar for bleeding and nonbleeding symptoms in both cohorts. Multivariate
      analysis showed that lower gastrointestinal symptoms were not associated with the
      risk of any type of advanced neoplasia in young Korean patients.Ethnic
      disparities in the prevalence of advanced neoplasia on diagnostic colonoscopy
      were not noticeable between Korean and US young patients. However, 40- to
      49-year-old patients with nonbleeding symptoms require more attention to detect
      advanced neoplasia in Korea than similarly aged patients in the United States.
FAU - Kwak, Min Seob
AU  - Kwak MS
AD  - aDepartment of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong,
      Kyung Hee University College of Medicine bDepartment of Gastroenterology,
      University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea
      cDigestive Disease Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA.
FAU - Cha, Jae Myung
AU  - Cha JM
FAU - Byeon, Jeong-Sik
AU  - Byeon JS
FAU - Lin, Otto S
AU  - Lin OS
FAU - Kozarek, Richard A
AU  - Kozarek RA
LA  - eng
PT  - Comparative Study
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Multicenter Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Medicine (Baltimore)
JT  - Medicine
JID - 2985248R
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Age Factors
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Colonoscopy/*statistics &amp; numerical data
MH  - Colorectal Neoplasms/*diagnosis/ethnology/pathology
MH  - Ethnic Groups
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Status Disparities
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Republic of Korea/epidemiology
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5585472
EDAT- 2017/09/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/01 06:00
AID - 10.1097/MD.0000000000007504 [doi]
AID - 00005792-201709010-00002 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Sep;96(35):e7504. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000007504.