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Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.

Abstract The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Postural Balance

Prostheses and Implants

Keywords
Journal Title the new zealand medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28859067
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170831
DCOM- 20170907
LR  - 20170907
IS  - 1175-8716 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-8446 (Linking)
VI  - 130
IP  - 1461
DP  - 2017 Sep 01
TI  - Bionic balance organs: progress in the development of vestibular prostheses.
PG  - 56-65
AB  - The vestibular system is a sensory system that is critically important in humans 
      for gaze and image stability as well as postural control. Patients with complete 
      bilateral vestibular loss are severely disabled and experience a poor quality of 
      life. There are very few effective treatment options for patients with no
      vestibular function. Over the last 10 years, rapid progress has been made in
      developing artificial 'vestibular implants' or 'prostheses', based on cochlear
      implant technology. As of 2017, 13 patients worldwide have received vestibular
      implants and the results are encouraging. Vestibular implants are now becoming
      part of an increasing effort to develop artificial, bionic sensory systems, and
      this paper provides a review of the progress in this area.
FAU - Smith, Paul F
AU  - Smith PF
AD  - Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, and Brain
      Health Research Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin; Brain Research New Zealand 
      Centre of Research Excellence, and the Eisdell Moore Centre for Hearing and
      Balance Research, University of Auckland, Auckland.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170901
PL  - New Zealand
TA  - N Z Med J
JT  - The New Zealand medical journal
JID - 0401067
SB  - IM
MH  - Clinical Trials as Topic
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Postural Balance
MH  - *Prostheses and Implants
MH  - Vestibular Diseases/*surgery
MH  - Vestibule, Labyrinth/anatomy & histology/*physiology
COI - Nil.
EDAT- 2017/09/01 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/01 06:00
PST - epublish
SO  - N Z Med J. 2017 Sep 1;130(1461):56-65.