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Determining the Seasonality of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the United States: The Impact of Increased Molecular Testing.

Abstract In the United States, the seasonality of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has traditionally been defined on the basis of weeks during which antigen-based tests detect RSV in >10% of specimens (hereafter, the "10% threshold"). Because molecular testing has become more widely used, we explored the extent of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based RSV testing and its impact on determining the seasonality of RSV.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Seasons

Keywords

RSV season

RSV surveillance

antigen diagnostic tests

molecular diagnostic tests

season threshold

Journal Title the journal of infectious diseases
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28859428
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170901
DCOM- 20170907
LR  - 20170907
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 216
IP  - 3
DP  - 2017 Aug 01
TI  - Determining the Seasonality of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the United States: 
      The Impact of Increased Molecular Testing.
PG  - 345-355
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jix275 [doi]
AB  - Background: In the United States, the seasonality of respiratory syncytial virus 
      (RSV) has traditionally been defined on the basis of weeks during which
      antigen-based tests detect RSV in >10% of specimens (hereafter, the "10%
      threshold"). Because molecular testing has become more widely used, we explored
      the extent of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based RSV testing and its impact on
      determining the seasonality of RSV. Methods: We assessed antigen- and PCR-based
      RSV reports submitted to the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance 
      System during July 2005-June 2015. To characterize RSV seasons by using PCR-based
      reports, we assessed the traditional 10% threshold; subsequently, we developed 3 
      methods based on either PCR-based detections or the percentage of positive test
      results. Results: The annual number of PCR-based reports increased 200-fold
      during 2005-2015, while the annual number of antigen-based reports declined. The 
      weekly percentage of specimens positive for RSV by PCR was less than that for
      antigen-detection tests; accordingly, the 10% threshold excluded detections by
      PCR and so was imprecise for characterizing RSV seasons. Among our PCR-specific
      approaches, the most sensitive and consistent method captured 96%-98% of annual
      detections within a season, compared with 82%-94% captured using the traditional 
      method. Conclusions: PCR-based reports are increasingly relevant for RSV
      surveillance and determining the seasonality of RSV. These PCR-specific methods
      provide a more comprehensive understanding of RSV trends, particularly in
      settings where testing and reporting are most active. Diagnostic practices will
      vary by locality and should be understood before choosing which method to apply.
FAU - Midgley, Claire M
AU  - Midgley CM
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
AD  - Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
FAU - Haynes, Amber K
AU  - Haynes AK
AD  - IHRC.
FAU - Baumgardner, Jason L
AU  - Baumgardner JL
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
FAU - Chommanard, Christina
AU  - Chommanard C
AD  - P3S.
FAU - Demas, Sara W
AU  - Demas SW
AD  - Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Prill, Mila M
AU  - Prill MM
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
FAU - Abedi, Glen R
AU  - Abedi GR
AD  - IHRC.
FAU - Curns, Aaron T
AU  - Curns AT
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
FAU - Watson, John T
AU  - Watson JT
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
FAU - Gerber, Susan I
AU  - Gerber SI
AD  - Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory
      Diseases.
LA  - eng
PT  - Comparative Study
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/*methods
MH  - Polymerase Chain Reaction
MH  - Population Surveillance
MH  - Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/*diagnosis/*epidemiology
MH  - Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
MH  - *Seasons
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - RSV season
OT  - RSV surveillance
OT  - antigen diagnostic tests
OT  - molecular diagnostic tests
OT  - season threshold
EDAT- 2017/09/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/08 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/02 06:00
PHST- 2017/03/30 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/01 [accepted]
AID - 3860464 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jix275 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2017 Aug 1;216(3):345-355. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix275.