PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Reducing the Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease, Part 1: The Epidemiology and Risk Factors.

Abstract Current global health policy goals include a 25% reduction in premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases by 2025. In this 2-part review, we provide an overview of the current epidemiological data on cardiovascular diseases (CVD), its risk factors, and describe strategies aimed at reducing its burden. In part 1, we examine the global epidemiology of cardiac conditions that have the greatest impact on CVD mortality; the predominant risk factors; and the impact of upstream, societal health determinants (eg, environmental factors, health policy, and health systems) on CVD. Although age-standardized mortality from CVD has decreased in many regions of the world, the absolute number of deaths continues to increase, with the majority now occurring in middle- and low-income countries. It is evident that multiple factors are causally related to CVD, including traditional individual level risk factors (mainly tobacco use, lipids, and elevated blood pressure) and societal level health determinants (eg, health systems, health policies, and barriers to CVD prevention and care). Both individual and societal risk factors vary considerably between different regions of the world and economic settings. However, reliable data to estimate CVD burden are lacking in many regions of the world, which hampers the establishment of nationwide prevention and management strategies. A 25% reduction in premature CVD mortality globally is feasible but will require better implementation of evidence-based policies (particularly tobacco control) and integrated health systems strategies that improve CVD prevention and management. In addition, there is a need for better health information to monitor progress and guide health policy decisions.
PMID
Related Publications

Endemic Cardiovascular Diseases of the Poorest Billion.

Estimates of global and regional premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025.

Mortality from cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis of data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Challenges for the management of hypertension in low-resource settings.

Global, Regional, and National Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases for 10 Causes, 1990 to 2015.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Global Burden of Disease

Keywords

blood pressure

cardiovascular diseases

epidemiology

risk factors

tobacco

Journal Title circulation research
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28860318
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170901
DCOM- 20170906
LR  - 20170906
IS  - 1524-4571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0009-7330 (Linking)
VI  - 121
IP  - 6
DP  - 2017 Sep 01
TI  - Reducing the Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease, Part 1: The Epidemiology
      and Risk Factors.
PG  - 677-694
LID - 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.308903 [doi]
AB  - Current global health policy goals include a 25% reduction in premature mortality
      from noncommunicable diseases by 2025. In this 2-part review, we provide an
      overview of the current epidemiological data on cardiovascular diseases (CVD),
      its risk factors, and describe strategies aimed at reducing its burden. In part
      1, we examine the global epidemiology of cardiac conditions that have the
      greatest impact on CVD mortality; the predominant risk factors; and the impact of
      upstream, societal health determinants (eg, environmental factors, health policy,
      and health systems) on CVD. Although age-standardized mortality from CVD has
      decreased in many regions of the world, the absolute number of deaths continues
      to increase, with the majority now occurring in middle- and low-income countries.
      It is evident that multiple factors are causally related to CVD, including
      traditional individual level risk factors (mainly tobacco use, lipids, and
      elevated blood pressure) and societal level health determinants (eg, health
      systems, health policies, and barriers to CVD prevention and care). Both
      individual and societal risk factors vary considerably between different regions 
      of the world and economic settings. However, reliable data to estimate CVD burden
      are lacking in many regions of the world, which hampers the establishment of
      nationwide prevention and management strategies. A 25% reduction in premature CVD
      mortality globally is feasible but will require better implementation of
      evidence-based policies (particularly tobacco control) and integrated health
      systems strategies that improve CVD prevention and management. In addition, there
      is a need for better health information to monitor progress and guide health
      policy decisions.
CI  - (c) 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
FAU - Joseph, Philip
AU  - Joseph P
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
      [email protected]
FAU - Leong, Darryl
AU  - Leong D
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - McKee, Martin
AU  - McKee M
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - Anand, Sonia S
AU  - Anand SS
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - Schwalm, Jon-David
AU  - Schwalm JD
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - Teo, Koon
AU  - Teo K
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - Mente, Andrew
AU  - Mente A
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
FAU - Yusuf, Salim
AU  - Yusuf S
AD  - From the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University and Hamilton
      Health Sciences, Ontario, Canada (P.J., D.L., S.S.A., J.-D.S., K.T., A.M., S.Y.);
      and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom (M.M.).
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Circ Res
JT  - Circulation research
JID - 0047103
SB  - IM
MH  - Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology
MH  - *Global Burden of Disease
MH  - Humans
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - blood pressure
OT  - cardiovascular diseases
OT  - epidemiology
OT  - risk factors
OT  - tobacco
EDAT- 2017/09/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/02 06:00
AID - CIRCRESAHA.117.308903 [pii]
AID - 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.308903 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Circ Res. 2017 Sep 1;121(6):677-694. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.308903.