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Management of Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression.

Abstract Cancer metastasis is a key event in tumor progression associated not only with mortality but also significant morbidity. Metastatic disease can promote end-organ dysfunction and even failure through mass effect compression of various vital organs including the spinal cord. In such cases, prompt medical attention is needed to restore neurological function, relieve pain, and prevent permanent damage. The three therapeutic approaches to managing metastatic spinal cord compression include corticosteroids, surgery, and radiation therapy. Although each may improve patients' symptoms, their combination has yielded the best outcome. In cancer patients with clinical suspicion of spinal cord compression, dexamethasone should be initiated followed by surgical decompression, when possible, and radiation. The latter becomes the preferred treatment in patients with inoperable disease.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title southern medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28863223
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
DA  - 20170901
LR  - 20170901
IS  - 1541-8243 (Electronic)
IS  - 0038-4348 (Linking)
VI  - 110
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Management of Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression.
PG  - 586-593
LID - 10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000700 [doi]
AB  - Cancer metastasis is a key event in tumor progression associated not only with
      mortality but also significant morbidity. Metastatic disease can promote
      end-organ dysfunction and even failure through mass effect compression of various
      vital organs including the spinal cord. In such cases, prompt medical attention
      is needed to restore neurological function, relieve pain, and prevent permanent
      damage. The three therapeutic approaches to managing metastatic spinal cord
      compression include corticosteroids, surgery, and radiation therapy. Although
      each may improve patients' symptoms, their combination has yielded the best
      outcome. In cancer patients with clinical suspicion of spinal cord compression,
      dexamethasone should be initiated followed by surgical decompression, when
      possible, and radiation. The latter becomes the preferred treatment in patients
      with inoperable disease.
FAU - Sodji, Quaovi
AU  - Sodji Q
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Kaminski, Joseph
AU  - Kaminski J
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Willey, Christopher
AU  - Willey C
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Kim, Nathan
AU  - Kim N
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Mourad, Waleed
AU  - Mourad W
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Vender, John
AU  - Vender J
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
FAU - Dasher, Byron
AU  - Dasher B
AD  - From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and Neurosurgery, 
      Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Dattoli Cancer Center, Sarasota,
      Florida, the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, and the Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Oncology,
      Waco.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - South Med J
JT  - Southern medical journal
JID - 0404522
EDAT- 2017/09/02 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/02 06:00
AID - 10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000700 [doi]
AID - SMJ50426 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - South Med J. 2017 Sep;110(9):586-593. doi: 10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000700.