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Vision Screening in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

Abstract One of the most important causes of vision abnormalities in children is amblyopia (also known as "lazy eye"). Amblyopia is an alteration in the visual neural pathway in a child's developing brain that can lead to permanent vision loss in the affected eye. Among children younger than 6 years, 1% to 6% have amblyopia or its risk factors (strabismus, anisometropia, or both). Early identification of vision abnormalities could prevent the development of amblyopia.
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Vision Screening in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Vision Screening

Keywords
Journal Title jama
Publication Year Start




PMID- 28873168
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA  - 20170905
DCOM- 20170912
LR  - 20170912
IS  - 1538-3598 (Electronic)
IS  - 0098-7484 (Linking)
VI  - 318
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep 05
TI  - Vision Screening in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years: US Preventive Services
      Task Force Recommendation Statement.
PG  - 836-844
LID - 10.1001/jama.2017.11260 [doi]
AB  - Importance: One of the most important causes of vision abnormalities in children 
      is amblyopia (also known as "lazy eye"). Amblyopia is an alteration in the visual
      neural pathway in a child's developing brain that can lead to permanent vision
      loss in the affected eye. Among children younger than 6 years, 1% to 6% have
      amblyopia or its risk factors (strabismus, anisometropia, or both). Early
      identification of vision abnormalities could prevent the development of
      amblyopia. Subpopulation Considerations: Studies show that screening rates among 
      children vary by race/ethnicity and family income. Data based on parent reports
      from 2009-2010 indicated identical screening rates among black non-Hispanic
      children and white non-Hispanic children (80.7%); however, Hispanic children were
      less likely than non-Hispanic children to report vision screening (69.8%).
      Children whose families earned 200% or more above the federal poverty level were 
      more likely to report vision screening than families with lower incomes.
      Objective: To update the 2011 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
      recommendation on screening for amblyopia and its risk factors in children.
      Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of vision
      screening tests and the benefits and harms of vision screening and treatment.
      Surgical interventions were considered to be out of scope for this review.
      Findings: Treatment of amblyopia is associated with moderate improvements in
      visual acuity in children aged 3 to 5 years, which are likely to result in
      permanent improvements in vision throughout life. The USPSTF concluded that the
      benefits are moderate because untreated amblyopia results in permanent,
      uncorrectable vision loss, and the benefits of screening and treatment
      potentially can be experienced over a child's lifetime. The USPSTF found adequate
      evidence to bound the potential harms of treatment (ie, higher false-positive
      rates in low-prevalence populations) as small. Therefore, the USPSTF concluded
      with moderate certainty that the overall net benefit is moderate for children
      aged 3 to 5 years. Conclusions and Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends vision 
      screening at least once in all children aged 3 to 5 years to detect amblyopia or 
      its risk factors. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current
      evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of vision
      screening in children younger than 3 years. (I statement).
CN  - US Preventive Services Task Force
FAU - Grossman, David C
AU  - Grossman DC
AD  - Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle.
FAU - Curry, Susan J
AU  - Curry SJ
AD  - University of Iowa, Iowa City.
FAU - Owens, Douglas K
AU  - Owens DK
AD  - Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California.
AD  - Stanford University, Stanford, California.
FAU - Barry, Michael J
AU  - Barry MJ
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
FAU - Davidson, Karina W
AU  - Davidson KW
AD  - Columbia University, New York, New York.
FAU - Doubeni, Chyke A
AU  - Doubeni CA
AD  - University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
FAU - Epling, John W Jr
AU  - Epling JW Jr
AD  - Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke.
FAU - Kemper, Alex R
AU  - Kemper AR
AD  - Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
FAU - Krist, Alex H
AU  - Krist AH
AD  - Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia.
AD  - Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.
FAU - Kurth, Ann E
AU  - Kurth AE
AD  - Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
FAU - Landefeld, C Seth
AU  - Landefeld CS
AD  - University of Alabama at Birmingham.
FAU - Mangione, Carol M
AU  - Mangione CM
AD  - University of California, Los Angeles.
FAU - Phipps, Maureen G
AU  - Phipps MG
AD  - Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
FAU - Silverstein, Michael
AU  - Silverstein M
AD  - Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
FAU - Simon, Melissa A
AU  - Simon MA
AD  - Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
FAU - Tseng, Chien-Wen
AU  - Tseng CW
AD  - University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
AD  - Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Practice Guideline
PL  - United States
TA  - JAMA
JT  - JAMA
JID - 7501160
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Advisory Committees
MH  - Amblyopia/*diagnosis
MH  - Anisometropia/diagnosis
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - False Positive Reactions
MH  - Female
MH  - Hispanic Americans
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Male
MH  - Mass Screening
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Strabismus/diagnosis
MH  - United States
MH  - *Vision Screening
EDAT- 2017/09/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/09/06 06:00
AID - 2652657 [pii]
AID - 10.1001/jama.2017.11260 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - JAMA. 2017 Sep 5;318(9):836-844. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11260.