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Overview of Silica-Related Clusters in the United States: Will Fracking Operations Become the Next Cluster?

Abstract Silicosis is the oldest know occupational pulmonary disease. It is a progressive disease and any level of exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles or dust has the potential to develop into silicosis. Silicosis is caused by silica particles or dust entering the lungs and damaging healthy lung tissue. The damage restricts the ability to breathe. Exposure to silica increases a worker’s risk of developing cancer or tuberculosis. This special report will provide background history of silicosis in the U.S., including the number of workers affected and their common industries. Over the years, these industries have impeded government oversight, resulting in silicosis exposure clusters. The risk of acquiring silicosis is diminished when industry implements safety measures with oversight by governmental agencies. Reputable authorities believe that the current innovative drilling techniques such as fracking will generate future cases of silicosis in the U.S. if safety measures to protect workers are ignored.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Hydraulic Fracking

Occupational Diseases

Silicosis

Keywords
Journal Title journal of environmental health
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29135200
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171212
LR  - 20171212
IS  - 0022-0892 (Print)
IS  - 0022-0892 (Linking)
VI  - 79
IP  - 6
DP  - 2017 Jan-Feb
TI  - Overview of Silica-Related Clusters in the United States: Will Fracking
      Operations Become the Next Cluster?
PG  - 20-7
AB  - Silicosis is the oldest know occupational pulmonary disease. It is a progressive 
      disease and any level of exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles or
      dust has the potential to develop into silicosis. Silicosis is caused by silica
      particles or dust entering the lungs and damaging healthy lung tissue. The damage
      restricts the ability to breathe. Exposure to silica increases a worker's risk of
      developing cancer or tuberculosis. This special report will provide background
      history of silicosis in the U.S., including the number of workers affected and
      their common industries. Over the years, these industries have impeded government
      oversight, resulting in silicosis exposure clusters. The risk of acquiring
      silicosis is diminished when industry implements safety measures with oversight
      by governmental agencies. Reputable authorities believe that the current
      innovative drilling techniques such as fracking will generate future cases of
      silicosis in the U.S. if safety measures to protect workers are ignored.
FAU - Quail, M Thomas
AU  - Quail MT
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Environ Health
JT  - Journal of environmental health
JID - 0405525
RN  - 7631-86-9 (Silicon Dioxide)
SB  - IM
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Hydraulic Fracking
MH  - *Occupational Diseases/epidemiology/etiology/prevention & control
MH  - Occupational Exposure/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Silicon Dioxide
MH  - *Silicosis
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2017/11/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/13 06:00
CRDT- 2017/11/15 06:00
PHST- 2017/11/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/11/15 06:00 [entrez]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Environ Health. 2017 Jan-Feb;79(6):20-7.