PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions.

Abstract A multitude of factors can affect drug response in individuals. It is now well established that variations in genes, especially those coding for drug metabolising enzymes, can alter the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic profile of a drug, impacting on efficacy and often resulting in drug-induced toxicity. The UDRUGS study is an initiative from the Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics to biobank DNA and store associated clinical data from patients who have suffered rare and/or serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aim is to provide a genetic explanation of drug-induced ADRs using methods ranging from Sanger sequencing to whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Participants for the UDRUGS study are recruited from various sources, mainly via referral through clinicians working in Canterbury District Health Board, but also from district health boards across New Zealand. Participants have also self-referred to us from word-of-mouth communication between participants. We have recruited various ADRs across most drug classes. Where possible, we have conducted genetic analyses in single or a cohort of cases to identify known and novel genetic association(s) to offer an explanation to why the ADR occurred. Any genetic results relevant to the ADR are communicated back to the referring clinician and/or participant. In conclusion, we have developed a programme for studying the genetic basis of severe, rare or unusual ADR cases resulting from pharmacological treatment. Genomic analyses could eventually identify most genetic variants that predispose to ADRs, enabling a priori detection of such variants with high throughput DNA tests.
PMID
Related Publications

Linking pharmacovigilance with pharmacogenetics.

Progress in understanding the genomic basis for adverse drug reactions: a comprehensive review and focus on the role of ethnicity.

Clinical association between pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions.

The Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety: a model for safety pharmacology.

Impact of New Genomic Technologies on Understanding Adverse Drug Reactions.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title the new zealand medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29197902
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171211
LR  - 20171211
IS  - 1175-8716 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-8446 (Linking)
VI  - 130
IP  - 1466
DP  - 2017 Dec 1
TI  - A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions.
PG  - 62-69
AB  - A multitude of factors can affect drug response in individuals. It is now well
      established that variations in genes, especially those coding for drug
      metabolising enzymes, can alter the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic
      profile of a drug, impacting on efficacy and often resulting in drug-induced
      toxicity. The UDRUGS study is an initiative from the Carney Centre for
      Pharmacogenomics to biobank DNA and store associated clinical data from patients 
      who have suffered rare and/or serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aim is
      to provide a genetic explanation of drug-induced ADRs using methods ranging from 
      Sanger sequencing to whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Participants for
      the UDRUGS study are recruited from various sources, mainly via referral through 
      clinicians working in Canterbury District Health Board, but also from district
      health boards across New Zealand. Participants have also self-referred to us from
      word-of-mouth communication between participants. We have recruited various ADRs 
      across most drug classes. Where possible, we have conducted genetic analyses in
      single or a cohort of cases to identify known and novel genetic association(s) to
      offer an explanation to why the ADR occurred. Any genetic results relevant to the
      ADR are communicated back to the referring clinician and/or participant. In
      conclusion, we have developed a programme for studying the genetic basis of
      severe, rare or unusual ADR cases resulting from pharmacological treatment.
      Genomic analyses could eventually identify most genetic variants that predispose 
      to ADRs, enabling a priori detection of such variants with high throughput DNA
      tests.
FAU - Maggo, Simran Ds
AU  - Maggo SD
AD  - Research Fellow, Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics and Department of Pathology, 
      University of Otago, Christchurch.
FAU - Chua, Eng Wee
AU  - Chua EW
AD  - Lecturer, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur,
      Malaysia.
FAU - Chin, Paul
AU  - Chin P
AD  - Clinical Pharmacologist, Department of Medicine, University of Otago,
      Christchurch.
FAU - Cree, Simone
AU  - Cree S
AD  - Research Fellow, Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics and Department of Pathology, 
      University of Otago, Christchurch.
FAU - Pearson, John
AU  - Pearson J
AD  - Senior Research Fellow & Biostatistician, Biostatistics and Computational Biology
      Unit, University of Otago, Christchurch.
FAU - Doogue, Matthew
AU  - Doogue M
AD  - Clinical Pharmacologist, Department of Medicine, University of Otago,
      Christchurch.
FAU - Kennedy, Martin A
AU  - Kennedy MA
AD  - Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20171201
PL  - New Zealand
TA  - N Z Med J
JT  - The New Zealand medical journal
JID - 0401067
SB  - IM
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/*genetics
MH  - Genetic Association Studies/methods
MH  - Humans
MH  - New Zealand
MH  - Pharmacogenomic Testing/*methods
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
COIS- Dr Doogue reports grants from Health Research Council during the conduct of the
      study; Dr Doogue is employed by CDHB as a clinical pharmacologist with
      responsibilities including adverse drug reactions and medicines governance. Dr
      Doogue's work includes general medicine, and patients with adverse drug reactions
      are admitted under general medicine. Dr Doogue is a member of the Health Quality 
      and Safety Commission, Medicines Safety Expert Advisory Group.
EDAT- 2017/12/05 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/04 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/04 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/05 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [medline]
PST - epublish
SO  - N Z Med J. 2017 Dec 1;130(1466):62-69.