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The psychometric properties of a shortened Dutch version of the consequences scale used in the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey.

Abstract Alcohol and drug misuse among college students has been studied extensively and has been clearly identified as a public health problem. Within more general populations alcohol misuse remains one of the leading causes of disease, disability and death worldwide. Conducting research on alcohol misuse requires valid and reliable instruments to measure its consequences. One scale that is often used is the consequences scale in the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey (CADS). However, psychometric studies on the CADS are rare and the ones that do exist report varying results. This article aims to address this imbalance by examining the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the CADS in a large sample of Flemish university and college students.
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Alcohol Drinking

Psychometrics

Substance-Related Disorders

Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29216206
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180105
LR  - 20180105
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017
TI  - The psychometric properties of a shortened Dutch version of the consequences
      scale used in the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey.
PG  - e0187876
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0187876 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Alcohol and drug misuse among college students has been studied
      extensively and has been clearly identified as a public health problem. Within
      more general populations alcohol misuse remains one of the leading causes of
      disease, disability and death worldwide. Conducting research on alcohol misuse
      requires valid and reliable instruments to measure its consequences. One scale
      that is often used is the consequences scale in the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey 
      (CADS). However, psychometric studies on the CADS are rare and the ones that do
      exist report varying results. This article aims to address this imbalance by
      examining the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the CADS in a large
      sample of Flemish university and college students. METHODS: The analyses are
      based on data collected by the inter-university project 'Head in the clouds',
      measuring alcohol use among students. In total, 19,253 students participated
      (22.1% response rate). The CADS scale was measured using 19 consequences, and
      participants were asked how often they had experienced these on a 6-point scale. 
      Firstly, the factor structure of the CADS was examined. Two models from
      literature were compared by performing confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and
      were adapted if necessary. Secondly, we assessed the composite reliability as
      well as the convergent, discriminant and concurrent validity. RESULTS: The
      two-factor model, identifying personal consequences (had a hangover; got
      nauseated or vomited; missed a class) and social consequences (got into an
      argument or fight; been criticized by someone I know; done something I later
      regretted; been hurt or injured) was indicated to be the best model, having both 
      a good model fit and an acceptable composite reliability. In addition, construct 
      validity was evaluated to be acceptable, with good discriminant validity,
      although the convergent validity of the factor measuring 'social consequences'
      could be improved. Concurrent validity was evaluated as good. CONCLUSIONS: In
      deciding which model best represents the data, it is crucial that not only the
      model fit is evaluated, but the importance of factor reliability and validity
      issues is also taken into account. The two-factor model, identifying personal
      consequences and social consequences, was concluded to be the best model. This
      shortened Dutch version of the CADS (CADS_D) is a useful tool to screen
      alcohol-related consequences among college students.
FAU - De Bruyn, Sara
AU  - De Bruyn S
AD  - Department of Sociology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Wouters, Edwin
AU  - Wouters E
AD  - Department of Sociology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Ponnet, Koen
AU  - Ponnet K
AD  - Department of Sociology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Communication Studies, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Communication Studies, MICT-IMEC, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
FAU - Van Damme, Joris
AU  - Van Damme J
AD  - Association for Alcohol and other Drug problems, Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Van Hal, Guido
AU  - Van Hal G
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Medical Sociology and Health
      Policy, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
CN  - Task Force substance use in Flemish universities and colleges
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Validation Studies
DEP - 20171207
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - *Alcohol Drinking
MH  - Belgium
MH  - Factor Analysis, Statistical
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Psychometrics
MH  - Reproducibility of Results
MH  - *Substance-Related Disorders
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5720707
EDAT- 2017/12/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/06 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/10/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0187876 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-42354 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Dec 7;12(12):e0187876. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187876.
      eCollection 2017.