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Newborn hearing screening failure and maternal factors during pregnancy.

Abstract Temporary conductive hearing loss due to amniotic fluid accumulation in the middle ear cavity may lead to failure (false positive) in newborn hearing screening tests. The aim of this study was to identify whether amniotic fluid index has association with failure of the initial newborn otoacoustic emission (OAE) screening test.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Amniotic Fluid

Keywords

Amniotic fluid index

Newborn

Otoacoustic emission

Smoking

Journal Title international journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29224768
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171226
LR  - 20171226
IS  - 1872-8464 (Electronic)
IS  - 0165-5876 (Linking)
VI  - 103
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Newborn hearing screening failure and maternal factors during pregnancy.
PG  - 65-70
LID - S0165-5876(17)30460-3 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.09.027 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Temporary conductive hearing loss due to amniotic fluid accumulation
      in the middle ear cavity may lead to failure (false positive) in newborn hearing 
      screening tests. The aim of this study was to identify whether amniotic fluid
      index has association with failure of the initial newborn otoacoustic emission
      (OAE) screening test. METHODS: A cohort study in a tertiary hospital center
      (Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal) was constructed from 70 newborns that failed 
      the OAE test, but passed a subsequent auditory brainstem response (ABR) test, and
      75 randomly selected newborns that passed initial otoacoustic emission testing.
      Maternal (including the amniotic fluid index in the third trimester) and newborn 
      clinical data were extracted from medical records. Statistical association models
      were built to determine variables that influenced hearing screen passage or
      failure. RESULTS: The two arms of the cohort had no significant differences in
      maternal or child clinical indices, including in amniotic fluid index. Calculated
      as individual odds ratios, maternal tobacco [95% CI of odds ratio: 0.04, 0.59, p 
      = 0.0078], and drug use [95% CI of odds ratio: 0.0065, 0.72, p = 0.058]
      [borderline significance] were associated with failing the otoacoustic emission
      testing. CONCLUSIONS: Amniotic fluid index was not found to be associated with
      failure of otoacoustic emission screening in newborns. However, our study
      unveiled an interesting unexpected association of OAE failure with maternal
      smoking and/or drug use. This finding can help alleviate some of the time, cost
      and parental anxiety related to failed OAE screening. In selected cases of
      maternal smoking or drug use we might want to replace or add OAE to the ABR test 
      in newborn hearing screening protocols, that don't perform both tests before
      discharge.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
FAU - Schwarz, Yehuda
AU  - Schwarz Y
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Montreal Children's
      Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Kaufman, Gabriel N
AU  - Kaufman GN
AD  - Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases (RESP) Program, The Research
      Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Daniel, Sam J
AU  - Daniel SJ
AD  - Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Montreal Children's
      Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address:
      [email protected]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170928
PL  - Ireland
TA  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol
JT  - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
JID - 8003603
SB  - IM
MH  - *Amniotic Fluid
MH  - Canada
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
MH  - Female
MH  - Hearing Loss, Conductive/*diagnosis/etiology
MH  - Hearing Tests/*methods
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Male
MH  - Neonatal Screening/*methods
MH  - Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous/physiology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Risk Factors
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Amniotic fluid index
OT  - Newborn
OT  - Otoacoustic emission
OT  - Smoking
EDAT- 2017/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/27 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/05/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/09/24 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/09/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0165-5876(17)30460-3 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.09.027 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Dec;103:65-70. doi:
      10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.09.027. Epub 2017 Sep 28.