PubTransformer

A site to transform Pubmed publications into these bibliographic reference formats: ADS, BibTeX, EndNote, ISI used by the Web of Knowledge, RIS, MEDLINE, Microsoft's Word 2007 XML.

Detection of duo-schistosome infection from filtered urine samples from school children in Zambia after MDA.

Abstract Schistosomiasis is one of the major Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) in sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, two major human schistosome species namely Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium often occur sympatrically largely affecting children. Recognizing the public health impact of Schistosomiasis, the World Health Organization (WHO) is urging member states to regularly treat at least 75% and up to 100%, of all school-aged children at risk of morbidity. For control strategies based on targeted mass drug administration (MDA) to succeed it is essential to have a simple and sensitive test for monitoring the success of these interventions. Current available diagnostic tests, such as egg detection in stool by Kato-Katz (KK) for S. mansoni and detection of eggs or blood (hematuria) in urine for S. haematobium have reduced sensitivity in low intensity settings. The objective of the study was to evaluate active single or duo schistosome infections in school children following MDA using molecular diagnostics (PCR) on filtered urine samples and comparing that against traditional diagnostic tests. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 111 school children aged 7-15 years in Chongwe and Siavonga Districts in Zambia. Species-specific cell-free repeat DNA fragment were amplified from 111 filtered urine samples. Our approach detected eight times more positive cases (total 77) than by KK (9) for S. mansoni and six times more (total 72) than by hematuria (11) for S. haematobium and even more against urine filtration (77 compared to only 6). The same pattern was observed when stratified for age group and sex specific analysis with 100% sensitivity and specificity devoid of any cross amplification. In addition, 69 individuals (62%) were co-infected by both parasites. We have demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of both species than indicated by the traditional tests and the persistent maintenance of reservoir of infection after MDA. Our approach is an effective means of detecting low intensity infection, which will enhance the effectiveness of surveillance and assess the impact of MDA control programs against schistosomiasis.
PMID
Related Publications

PREVALENCE AND INTENSITY OF SINGLE AND MIXED SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI AND SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM INFECTIONS IN PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN RACHUONYO NORTH DISTRICT, HOMABAY COUNTY, WESTERN KENYA.

Diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni without the stool: comparison of three diagnostic tests to detect Schistosoma corrected mansoni infection from filtered urine in Zambia.

A new rapid diagnostic test for detection of anti-Schistosoma mansoni and anti-Schistosoma haematobium antibodies.

Point of care diagnosis of multiple schistosome parasites: Species-specific DNA detection in urine by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

Detection of parasite-specific DNA in urine sediment obtained by filtration differentiates between single and mixed infections of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium from endemic areas in Ghana.

Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos one
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29228024
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180104
LR  - 20180104
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017
TI  - Detection of duo-schistosome infection from filtered urine samples from school
      children in Zambia after MDA.
PG  - e0189400
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0189400 [doi]
AB  - Schistosomiasis is one of the major Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) in
      sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, two major human schistosome species
      namely Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium often occur sympatrically largely
      affecting children. Recognizing the public health impact of Schistosomiasis, the 
      World Health Organization (WHO) is urging member states to regularly treat at
      least 75% and up to 100%, of all school-aged children at risk of morbidity. For
      control strategies based on targeted mass drug administration (MDA) to succeed it
      is essential to have a simple and sensitive test for monitoring the success of
      these interventions. Current available diagnostic tests, such as egg detection in
      stool by Kato-Katz (KK) for S. mansoni and detection of eggs or blood (hematuria)
      in urine for S. haematobium have reduced sensitivity in low intensity settings.
      The objective of the study was to evaluate active single or duo schistosome
      infections in school children following MDA using molecular diagnostics (PCR) on 
      filtered urine samples and comparing that against traditional diagnostic tests.
      This cross-sectional study was conducted among 111 school children aged 7-15
      years in Chongwe and Siavonga Districts in Zambia. Species-specific cell-free
      repeat DNA fragment were amplified from 111 filtered urine samples. Our approach 
      detected eight times more positive cases (total 77) than by KK (9) for S. mansoni
      and six times more (total 72) than by hematuria (11) for S. haematobium and even 
      more against urine filtration (77 compared to only 6). The same pattern was
      observed when stratified for age group and sex specific analysis with 100%
      sensitivity and specificity devoid of any cross amplification. In addition, 69
      individuals (62%) were co-infected by both parasites. We have demonstrated a
      significantly higher prevalence of both species than indicated by the traditional
      tests and the persistent maintenance of reservoir of infection after MDA. Our
      approach is an effective means of detecting low intensity infection, which will
      enhance the effectiveness of surveillance and assess the impact of MDA control
      programs against schistosomiasis.
FAU - Hessler, Megan J
AU  - Hessler MJ
AD  - Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee,
      Wisconsin, United States of America.
FAU - Cyrs, Austin
AU  - Cyrs A
AD  - Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee,
      Wisconsin, United States of America.
FAU - Krenzke, Steven C
AU  - Krenzke SC
AD  - Department of Biology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States 
      of America.
FAU - Mahmoud, El Shaimaa
AU  - Mahmoud ES
AD  - Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee,
      Wisconsin, United States of America.
FAU - Sikasunge, Chummy
AU  - Sikasunge C
AD  - Department of Para-clinical Studies, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
FAU - Mwansa, James
AU  - Mwansa J
AD  - University Teaching Hospital, The University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
FAU - Lodh, Nilanjan
AU  - Lodh N
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0363-3538
AD  - Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee,
      Wisconsin, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20171211
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
MH  - Polymerase Chain Reaction
MH  - Schistosomiasis/*diagnosis/urine
MH  - Zambia
PMC - PMC5724860
EDAT- 2017/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/05 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/11/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0189400 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-29819 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Dec 11;12(12):e0189400. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0189400.
      eCollection 2017.