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Assessing the ownership, usage and knowledge of Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs) in Malaria Prevention in the Hohoe Municipality, Ghana.

Abstract Malaria remains one of the top five killer diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and its burden is skewed towards pregnant women and children under five. Insecticide Treated Bed-Net (ITN) usage is considered one of the most cost-effective, preventive interventions against malaria. This study sought to assess ownership, usage, effectiveness, knowledge, access and availability of ITNs among mothers with children under five in the Hohoe municipality.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice

Ownership

Keywords

ITN ownership

ITN usage

Malaria prevention

caregivers

children

knowledge

Journal Title the pan african medical journal
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29255537
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171222
LR  - 20171222
IS  - 1937-8688 (Electronic)
VI  - 28
DP  - 2017
TI  - Assessing the ownership, usage and knowledge of Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs)
      in Malaria Prevention in the Hohoe Municipality, Ghana.
PG  - 67
LID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.67.9934 [doi]
AB  - Introduction: Malaria remains one of the top five killer diseases in sub-Saharan 
      Africa (SSA) and its burden is skewed towards pregnant women and children under
      five. Insecticide Treated Bed-Net (ITN) usage is considered one of the most
      cost-effective, preventive interventions against malaria. This study sought to
      assess ownership, usage, effectiveness, knowledge, access and availability of
      ITNs among mothers with children under five in the Hohoe municipality. Methods:
      In August 2010 a cross-sectional survey was carried out in 30 communities,
      selected using the WHO 30 cluster sampling technique. In the selected
      communities, mothers/caregivers with children under five years were selected
      using the snowball method. Data were collected through questionnaires and direct 
      observation of ITN. Descriptive statistics was used to analyse the data
      collected. Results: A total of 450 mothers/caregivers were interviewed and their 
      mean age was 30 +/- 7 years. ITN ownership was 81.3%, and usage was 66.4%. The
      majority (97.8%) of the mothers/caregivers said ITNs were effective for malaria
      prevention. Awareness about ITNs was high (98.7%) and the majority (52.9%) had
      heard about ITNs from Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) Clinic and antenatal
      care ANC clinic (33.6%). Over 60% of the ITNs were acquired through free
      distribution at RCH clinics, clinic and home distribution during mass
      immunization sessions. The majority of the mothers/caregivers (78.6%) knew the
      signs and symptoms of malaria, what causes malaria (82.2%) and who is most at
      risk (90%). Conclusion: Behaviour change communication strategies on ITN use may 
      need to be further targeted to ensure full use of available ITNs.
FAU - Nyavor, Kunche Delali
AU  - Nyavor KD
AD  - Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Canada.
FAU - Kweku, Margaret
AU  - Kweku M
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
FAU - Agbemafle, Isaac
AU  - Agbemafle I
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
FAU - Takramah, Wisdom
AU  - Takramah W
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
FAU - Norman, Ishmael
AU  - Norman I
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
AD  - Institute for Security, Disaster and Emergency Studies, Sandpiper Place, Langma, 
      Central Region, Ghana.
FAU - Tarkang, Elvis
AU  - Tarkang E
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
AD  - HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Network, Cameroon, Kumba, South-West region,
      Cameroon.
FAU - Binka, Fred
AU  - Binka F
AD  - School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Volta
      region, Ghana.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170922
PL  - Uganda
TA  - Pan Afr Med J
JT  - The Pan African medical journal
JID - 101517926
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Caregivers/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Cluster Analysis
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Female
MH  - Ghana
MH  - *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Insecticide-Treated Bednets/*utilization
MH  - Malaria/*prevention & control
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Mothers/statistics & numerical data
MH  - *Ownership
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5724734
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - ITN ownership
OT  - ITN usage
OT  - Malaria prevention
OT  - caregivers
OT  - children
OT  - knowledge
EDAT- 2017/12/20 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/23 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/20 06:00
PHST- 2016/05/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/08/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/20 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/20 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/23 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.67.9934 [doi]
AID - PAMJ-28-67 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - Pan Afr Med J. 2017 Sep 22;28:67. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2017.28.67.9934. eCollection
      2017.