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Nodal Involvement by CD30+ Cutaneous Lymphoproliferative Disorders and Its Challenging Differentiation From Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

Abstract Primary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as non-Hodgkin lymphomas that present in the skin with no evidence of extracutaneous disease at the time of diagnosis. Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, representing almost 50% of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, and primary cutaneous CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are the second most common group (30%). Transformed mycosis fungoides is usually CD30+ and can involve multiple nodal sites; other primary cutaneous CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders can also involve draining regional nodes. Nodal involvement by CD30+ T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders can mimic classical Hodgkin lymphoma, which can aberrantly express T-cell antigens. The aim of this article is to briefly review salient clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features that can be used to distinguish lymph node involvement by CD30+ cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders from classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a clinically important differential diagnosis that represents a challenging task for the pathologist.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29257929
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180105
LR  - 20180105
IS  - 1543-2165 (Electronic)
IS  - 0003-9985 (Linking)
VI  - 142
IP  - 1
DP  - 2018 Jan
TI  - Nodal Involvement by CD30(+) Cutaneous Lymphoproliferative Disorders and Its
      Challenging Differentiation From Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.
PG  - 139-142
LID - 10.5858/arpa.2016-0352-RS [doi]
AB  - Primary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as non-Hodgkin lymphomas that present in 
      the skin with no evidence of extracutaneous disease at the time of diagnosis.
      Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma,
      representing almost 50% of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, and primary
      cutaneous CD30(+) T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are the second most common
      group (30%). Transformed mycosis fungoides is usually CD30(+) and can involve
      multiple nodal sites; other primary cutaneous CD30(+) T-cell lymphoproliferative 
      disorders can also involve draining regional nodes. Nodal involvement by CD30(+) 
      T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders can mimic classical Hodgkin lymphoma, which 
      can aberrantly express T-cell antigens. The aim of this article is to briefly
      review salient clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features
      that can be used to distinguish lymph node involvement by CD30(+) cutaneous
      T-cell lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders from classical Hodgkin
      lymphoma, a clinically important differential diagnosis that represents a
      challenging task for the pathologist.
FAU - Lezama, Lhara Sumarriva
AU  - Lezama LS
AD  - From the Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai St Luke's, Icahn School of Medicine
      at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (Dr Lezama); and the Department of Pathology, 
      Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (Dr Gratzinger).
FAU - Gratzinger, Dita
AU  - Gratzinger D
AD  - From the Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai St Luke's, Icahn School of Medicine
      at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (Dr Lezama); and the Department of Pathology, 
      Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (Dr Gratzinger).
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Arch Pathol Lab Med
JT  - Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
JID - 7607091
RN  - 0 (Ki-1 Antigen)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - B-Lymphocytes/immunology/pathology
MH  - Diagnosis, Differential
MH  - Flow Cytometry
MH  - Hodgkin Disease/*diagnosis/immunology/pathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunohistochemistry
MH  - Ki-1 Antigen/metabolism
MH  - Lymph Nodes/immunology/pathology
MH  - Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/diagnosis/immunology
MH  - Lymphoproliferative Disorders/*diagnosis/immunology/pathology
MH  - Mycosis Fungoides/diagnosis/immunology
MH  - Prognosis
MH  - T-Lymphocytes/immunology/pathology
EDAT- 2017/12/20 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/06 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/20 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/20 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/20 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.5858/arpa.2016-0352-RS [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2018 Jan;142(1):139-142. doi: 10.5858/arpa.2016-0352-RS.