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The Use and Pitfalls of Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging: How We Do It.

Abstract Intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has gained much attention in the past decade and has become part of state-of-the-art MR imaging protocols to assist in diagnosing the cause of ischemic stroke. With intracranial vessel wall imaging, vessel wall characteristics have tentatively been described for atherosclerosis, vasculitis, dissections, Moyamoya disease, and aneurysms. With the increasing demand and subsequently increased use of intracranial vessel wall imaging in clinical practice, radiologists should be aware of the choices in imaging parameters and how they affect image quality, the clinical indications, methods of assessment, and limitations in the interpretation of these images. In this How I do It article, the authors will discuss the technical requirements and considerations for vessel wall image acquisition in general, describe their own vessel wall imaging protocol at 3 T and 7 T, show a step-by-step basic assessment of intracranial vessel wall imaging as performed at their institution-including commonly encountered artifacts and pitfalls-and summarize the commonly reported imaging characteristics of various intracranial vessel wall diseases for direct clinical applicability. Finally, future technical and clinical considerations for full implementation of intracranial vessel wall imaging in clinical practice, including the need for histologic validation and acquisition time reduction, will be discussed.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title radiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29261469
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180108
LR  - 20180108
IS  - 1527-1315 (Electronic)
IS  - 0033-8419 (Linking)
VI  - 286
IP  - 1
DP  - 2018 Jan
TI  - The Use and Pitfalls of Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging: How We Do It.
PG  - 12-28
LID - 10.1148/radiol.2017162096 [doi]
AB  - Intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has gained much
      attention in the past decade and has become part of state-of-the-art MR imaging
      protocols to assist in diagnosing the cause of ischemic stroke. With intracranial
      vessel wall imaging, vessel wall characteristics have tentatively been described 
      for atherosclerosis, vasculitis, dissections, Moyamoya disease, and aneurysms.
      With the increasing demand and subsequently increased use of intracranial vessel 
      wall imaging in clinical practice, radiologists should be aware of the choices in
      imaging parameters and how they affect image quality, the clinical indications,
      methods of assessment, and limitations in the interpretation of these images. In 
      this How I do It article, the authors will discuss the technical requirements and
      considerations for vessel wall image acquisition in general, describe their own
      vessel wall imaging protocol at 3 T and 7 T, show a step-by-step basic assessment
      of intracranial vessel wall imaging as performed at their institution-including
      commonly encountered artifacts and pitfalls-and summarize the commonly reported
      imaging characteristics of various intracranial vessel wall diseases for direct
      clinical applicability. Finally, future technical and clinical considerations for
      full implementation of intracranial vessel wall imaging in clinical practice,
      including the need for histologic validation and acquisition time reduction, will
      be discussed.
FAU - Lindenholz, Arjen
AU  - Lindenholz A
AD  - From the Department of Radiology, Imaging Division, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508GA Utrecht, the Netherlands.
FAU - van der Kolk, Anja G
AU  - van der Kolk AG
AD  - From the Department of Radiology, Imaging Division, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508GA Utrecht, the Netherlands.
FAU - Zwanenburg, Jaco J M
AU  - Zwanenburg JJM
AD  - From the Department of Radiology, Imaging Division, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508GA Utrecht, the Netherlands.
FAU - Hendrikse, Jeroen
AU  - Hendrikse J
AD  - From the Department of Radiology, Imaging Division, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508GA Utrecht, the Netherlands.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Radiology
JT  - Radiology
JID - 0401260
RN  - 0 (Contrast Media)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Brain/*blood supply/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Cerebral Angiography
MH  - Contrast Media
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/*methods
MH  - Imaging, Three-Dimensional
MH  - Intracranial Arterial Diseases/*diagnostic imaging
MH  - Magnetic Resonance Imaging/*methods
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
EDAT- 2017/12/21 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/09 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/21 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/21 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1148/radiol.2017162096 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Radiology. 2018 Jan;286(1):12-28. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2017162096.