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Science to Practice: Can Functional MR Imaging Be Useful in the Evaluation of Cardiorenal Syndrome?

Abstract Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the kidneys has gained interest recently, especially in the detection of early changes in acute kidney injury or to predict progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The application of these methods to cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is novel. CRS is widely accepted as a complex clinical problem routinely faced by clinicians. In this issue, Chang et al ( 1 ) present their preliminary experience applying blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging to the kidneys in mice with experimental myocardial infarction. They showed that R2* in the kidney increases after induced myocardial infarction and that the response was higher in animals with larger infarcts and over time. The authors also for the first time correlated the BOLD MR imaging findings against hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression, an independent marker of renal hypoxia. In addition, they showed evidence for renal injury by using a kidney injury marker, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1). The results of their study support the use of renal BOLD MR imaging in subjects with heart failure, in whom the risk of subsequent renal ischemia and/or hypoxia is known to exist. These results, along with those of other recent reports ( 2 ), suggest that functional imaging methods could play a key role in evaluating changes in both the primary and secondary organs involved in complex disease processes such as CRS. Availability of such methods could facilitate translation to the clinic and improve the mechanistic understanding of the complicated and interrelated pathophysiology.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title radiology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29261470
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20171220
IS  - 1527-1315 (Electronic)
IS  - 0033-8419 (Linking)
VI  - 286
IP  - 1
DP  - 2018 Jan
TI  - Science to Practice: Can Functional MR Imaging Be Useful in the Evaluation of
      Cardiorenal Syndrome?
PG  - 1-3
LID - 10.1148/radiol.2017171957 [doi]
AB  - Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the kidneys has gained interest
      recently, especially in the detection of early changes in acute kidney injury or 
      to predict progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The application of these 
      methods to cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is novel. CRS is widely accepted as a
      complex clinical problem routinely faced by clinicians. In this issue, Chang et
      al ( 1 ) present their preliminary experience applying blood oxygen
      level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging to the kidneys in mice with experimental
      myocardial infarction. They showed that R2* in the kidney increases after induced
      myocardial infarction and that the response was higher in animals with larger
      infarcts and over time. The authors also for the first time correlated the BOLD
      MR imaging findings against hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha)
      expression, an independent marker of renal hypoxia. In addition, they showed
      evidence for renal injury by using a kidney injury marker, kidney injury
      molecule-1 (KIM-1). The results of their study support the use of renal BOLD MR
      imaging in subjects with heart failure, in whom the risk of subsequent renal
      ischemia and/or hypoxia is known to exist. These results, along with those of
      other recent reports ( 2 ), suggest that functional imaging methods could play a 
      key role in evaluating changes in both the primary and secondary organs involved 
      in complex disease processes such as CRS. Availability of such methods could
      facilitate translation to the clinic and improve the mechanistic understanding of
      the complicated and interrelated pathophysiology.
FAU - Pursnani, Amit
AU  - Pursnani A
AD  - Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine NorthShore University HealthSystem
      Evanston, Ill.
AD  - Department of Radiology NorthShore University HealthSystem 2650 Ridge Ave, Room
      5108 Evanston, IL 60201.
FAU - Prasad, Pottumarthi V
AU  - Prasad PV
AD  - Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine NorthShore University HealthSystem
      Evanston, Ill.
AD  - Department of Radiology NorthShore University HealthSystem 2650 Ridge Ave, Room
      5108 Evanston, IL 60201.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Radiology
JT  - Radiology
JID - 0401260
EDAT- 2017/12/21 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/21 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/21 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/21 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/21 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1148/radiol.2017171957 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Radiology. 2018 Jan;286(1):1-3. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2017171957.