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Boys in a famous choir: Singing and ticcing.

Abstract This informal observational study on the tic prevalence in 40 young singers was carried out during a public concert of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. Tics were highly prevalent (present in 35% = 14 boys). Given the possibility of an overrepresentation of perioral tics in this group of highly achieving young vocal artists, one might speculate that there is a relationship between the ability of the motor system to produce a surplus of movements (tics) and high performance (exquisite singing). Despite the unusual study design, with all its limitations, our observations strengthen the view that tics may be related to motor learning. However, alternative explanations, for example, that repetitive motor performance or personality traits in singers drive tic development, could also be true. In light of the boys choir's enchantment, the sole perception of tics as a disorder falls short of the properties of the motor system. Ann Neurol 2017;82:1029-1031.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title annals of neurology
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29265544
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180101
LR  - 20180101
IS  - 1531-8249 (Electronic)
IS  - 0364-5134 (Linking)
VI  - 82
IP  - 6
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Boys in a famous choir: Singing and ticcing.
PG  - 1029-1031
LID - 10.1002/ana.25112 [doi]
AB  - This informal observational study on the tic prevalence in 40 young singers was
      carried out during a public concert of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. Tics were
      highly prevalent (present in 35% = 14 boys). Given the possibility of an
      overrepresentation of perioral tics in this group of highly achieving young vocal
      artists, one might speculate that there is a relationship between the ability of 
      the motor system to produce a surplus of movements (tics) and high performance
      (exquisite singing). Despite the unusual study design, with all its limitations, 
      our observations strengthen the view that tics may be related to motor learning. 
      However, alternative explanations, for example, that repetitive motor performance
      or personality traits in singers drive tic development, could also be true. In
      light of the boys choir's enchantment, the sole perception of tics as a disorder 
      falls short of the properties of the motor system. Ann Neurol 2017;82:1029-1031.
CI  - (c) 2017 American Neurological Association.
FAU - Tunc, Sinem
AU  - Tunc S
AD  - Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lubeck.
AD  - Department of Neurology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany.
FAU - Munchau, Alexander
AU  - Munchau A
AD  - Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lubeck.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Observational Study
PL  - United States
TA  - Ann Neurol
JT  - Annals of neurology
JID - 7707449
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Singing/*physiology
MH  - Tics/*diagnosis/physiopathology
EDAT- 2017/12/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/22 06:00
PHST- 2017/10/02 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/11/30 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2017/11/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1002/ana.25112 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Ann Neurol. 2017 Dec;82(6):1029-1031. doi: 10.1002/ana.25112.