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CDC Grand Rounds: National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry Impact, Challenges, and Future Directions.

Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rapidly progressive fatal neurologic disease. Currently, there is no cure for ALS and the available treatments only extend life by an average of a few months. The majority of ALS patients die within 2-5 years of diagnosis, though survival time varies depending on disease progression (1,2). For approximately 10% of patients, ALS is familial, meaning it and has a genetic component; the remaining 90% have sporadic ALS, where etiology is unknown, but might be linked to environmental factors such as chemical exposures (e.g., heavy metals, pesticides) and occupational history (3).
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms

Registries

Keywords
Journal Title mmwr. morbidity and mortality weekly report
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29267263
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180102
LR  - 20180102
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 66
IP  - 50
DP  - 2017 Dec 22
TI  - CDC Grand Rounds: National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry Impact,
      Challenges, and Future Directions.
PG  - 1379-1382
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6650a3 [doi]
AB  - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a
      rapidly progressive fatal neurologic disease. Currently, there is no cure for ALS
      and the available treatments only extend life by an average of a few months. The 
      majority of ALS patients die within 2-5 years of diagnosis, though survival time 
      varies depending on disease progression (1,2). For approximately 10% of patients,
      ALS is familial, meaning it and has a genetic component; the remaining 90% have
      sporadic ALS, where etiology is unknown, but might be linked to environmental
      factors such as chemical exposures (e.g., heavy metals, pesticides) and
      occupational history (3).
FAU - Mehta, Paul
AU  - Mehta P
FAU - Horton, D Kevin
AU  - Horton DK
FAU - Kasarskis, Edward J
AU  - Kasarskis EJ
FAU - Tessaro, Ed
AU  - Tessaro E
FAU - Eisenberg, M Shira
AU  - Eisenberg MS
FAU - Laird, Susan
AU  - Laird S
FAU - Iskander, John
AU  - Iskander J
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20171222
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/*epidemiology/ethnology/*prevention &
      control/psychology
MH  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
MH  - European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Forecasting
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Population Surveillance/*methods
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - *Registries
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - United States/epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/12/22 06:00
MHDA- 2017/12/22 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/22 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6650a3 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Dec 22;66(50):1379-1382. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6650a3.