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The immunological mechanisms that control pneumococcal carriage.

Abstract Colonization of the human nasopharynx by pneumococcus is extremely common and is both the primary reservoir for transmission and a prerequisite for disease. Current vaccines targeting the polysaccharide capsule effectively prevent colonization, conferring herd protection within vaccinated communities. However, these vaccines cover only a subset of all circulating pneumococcal strains, and serotype replacement has been observed. Given the success of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in preventing colonization in unvaccinated adults within vaccinated communities, reducing nasopharyngeal colonization has become an outcome of interest for novel vaccines. Here, we discuss the immunological mechanisms that control nasopharyngeal colonization, with an emphasis on findings from human studies. Increased understanding of these immunological mechanisms is required to identify correlates of protection against colonization that will facilitate the early testing and design of novel vaccines.
PMID
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Authors

Mayor MeshTerms
Keywords
Journal Title plos pathogens
Publication Year Start




PMID- 29267378
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180102
LR  - 20180102
IS  - 1553-7374 (Electronic)
IS  - 1553-7366 (Linking)
VI  - 13
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - The immunological mechanisms that control pneumococcal carriage.
PG  - e1006665
LID - 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006665 [doi]
AB  - Colonization of the human nasopharynx by pneumococcus is extremely common and is 
      both the primary reservoir for transmission and a prerequisite for disease.
      Current vaccines targeting the polysaccharide capsule effectively prevent
      colonization, conferring herd protection within vaccinated communities. However, 
      these vaccines cover only a subset of all circulating pneumococcal strains, and
      serotype replacement has been observed. Given the success of pneumococcal
      conjugate vaccine (PCV) in preventing colonization in unvaccinated adults within 
      vaccinated communities, reducing nasopharyngeal colonization has become an
      outcome of interest for novel vaccines. Here, we discuss the immunological
      mechanisms that control nasopharyngeal colonization, with an emphasis on findings
      from human studies. Increased understanding of these immunological mechanisms is 
      required to identify correlates of protection against colonization that will
      facilitate the early testing and design of novel vaccines.
FAU - Jochems, Simon P
AU  - Jochems SP
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-4835-1032
AD  - Department of Clinicial Sciences, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine,
      Liverpool, United Kingdom.
FAU - Weiser, Jeffrey N
AU  - Weiser JN
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-7168-8090
AD  - Department of Microbiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New
      York, United States of America.
FAU - Malley, Richard
AU  - Malley R
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical
      School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
FAU - Ferreira, Daniela M
AU  - Ferreira DM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-0594-0902
AD  - Department of Clinicial Sciences, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine,
      Liverpool, United Kingdom.
LA  - eng
GR  - RO1 AI05168 /NH/NIH HHS/United States
GR  - RO1 AI38446/NH/NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Review
DEP - 20171221
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Pathog
JT  - PLoS pathogens
JID - 101238921
RN  - 0 (Pneumococcal Vaccines)
RN  - 0 (Vaccines, Conjugate)
SB  - IM
MH  - Carrier State/immunology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Nasopharynx/microbiology
MH  - Pneumococcal Infections/*immunology
MH  - Pneumococcal Vaccines/*immunology
MH  - Vaccines, Conjugate/immunology
EDAT- 2017/12/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/12/22 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/12/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/03 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006665 [doi]
AID - PPATHOGENS-D-17-01449 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Pathog. 2017 Dec 21;13(12):e1006665. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006665.
      eCollection 2017 Dec.